Concrete for hardscape paver edge/restraint?

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Agape, Jun 22, 2013.

  1. Agape

    Agape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,645

    Ijust had an Architect buddy tell me about a hardscaper who uses concrete as paver edge restraint. This contractor convinced the customer that snap- edging becomes brittle in weather and breaks easily, whereas the concrete lasts Eons or whatever.
    My friend explained that the concrete is not just against the edge, but under the edge as well.....??......I think it would be just the opposite.

    I think this has no validity, but I thought I'd run it by you guys.
    How do you use it if you are one who believes this?:confused:
     
  2. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,752

    I set my borders mortared down on a concrete footing. Check my thread for pics
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  3. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,401

    Concrete edge restraint is the worst thing to do.

    Those new in business whom haven't been called to repair jobs are not aware of this.

    The statement of Snap edge be omming brittle is 100% FALSE. I am not a contractor with 6 or less yrs experience we have used solely Snap Edge for 17 yrs with NO issues. Period. And we have winter here.

    See, concrete is not pliable, it does not flex. The ground moves.

    We have repaired paver installations done by others that have used concrete edging. It moves. It sinks, it cracks. Bad way to go.

    Probably I have a thread here from about 2 yrs ago going into more detail.
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  4. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,752

    Blanket statements are 100% false
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  5. skorum03

    skorum03 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 354

    Many times people choose the paver option over stamped concrete simply because pavers do not crack. For paver guys, its very easy to sell against anything concrete. With that being said I cannot imagine why someone would use concrete as a pave edge. Snap edging is cheap, if it were to break it is replaceable, the concrete is not.


    YardBros Outdoors
    www.yardbros.com
     
  6. Agape

    Agape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,645

    cant find your thread on this
     
  7. Agape

    Agape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,645

    That's exactly what I believe, and this architect is trying to convince me on stairs to put a concrete footer on the back of each course of stairs, (level, set stair course, then remove and dig a trench along back with a garden hand trowel, pour a line of concrete replace course).

    You see, the architect is a buddy of mine brought me in to bid (quote DVS) a job for part of a construction project, and I actually lost the "quote" to someone who was a couple grand more, but was actually able to meet with the HO and my architect, and gave them this crap about how much more resilient the work would be, and how mere mortals use snap edging and that would ruin the job etc.....

    The guy is obviously a GREAT salesman cause now my architect buddy (who should know better) thinks 2" of conc. will last 4eva:dizzy:
     
  8. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,628

    First of all snap edge will rot and break apart if....

    Common nails are used (frost will force up the nails and push the restraint edge out of the ground)
    which will then become brittle once the uv rays set in.

    It will remain intact if galvanized nails are used and it remains below the surface.

    Snap edge went thru a phase about 5 yrs ago, maybe less where there changed the locking system and at the same time they reduced the thickness (gauge) of plastic. I actually talked to the owner of snap edge and expressed my views about becoming cheaper and more flimsy. At first he didn't want to admit but eventually said that the material had less thickness to it. Within a year they had changed back to the original thickness and kept the newer locking system. Its a great product if used correctly.
     
  9. Agape

    Agape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,645

    WhAt do you mean "common" I use the 9" from the stone supply shop
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  10. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,628

    Common as in non galvanized, common nails will rust and expand (width) over time. Especially in frost laden areas of the continent. Salt is the main culprit
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