Contract cover letter

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by LawnsRUsInc., Jan 29, 2003.

  1. LawnsRUsInc.

    LawnsRUsInc. LawnSite Senior Member
    from midwest
    Posts: 916

    I was just wondering how you guys think for a lawncare contract cover letter this would be. I was going to send it out to all customers, since this is my first year for lawncare contracts. Any help or ideas would help.

    Thank you much Jason


    Dear Customers,

    I am writing this message to inform you how I believe will simplify monthly invoicing. The proposal which is attached with this letter is to allow us to both meet ends on what services are going to be performed at the property.
    The proposal for seasonal lawn care covers the following things, weekly lawn cutting, trimming and blowing. The price you see on the proposal is for the full season which is approximate six months. That price will be broken down to six monthly payments.
    I need the proposal's mailed back in so we can better prepare ourselves to prepare for the fast approaching season. Thus to not interrupt service.


    Sincerely,
     
  2. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    The first sentence doesn't sound right. Put some punctuation (commas) in you letter. Second sentence after the words "proposal" and "letter".
     
  3. crawdad

    crawdad LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    Read it aloud to yourself, it just doesn't roll off the tongue smoothly. Lets go over it a sentence at a time.
    Huh? How about, " I am writing this message to inform you how I will be simplifying monthly invoicing."
    How about, "The proposal, attached with this letter, is to allow us to agree upon what services are going to be performed at the property."
    How about, "The proposal for seasonal lawn care covers weekly lawn cutting, trimming and blowing."
    Not much to change here, a little but of mis-spelling, a couple words dropped for brevity...
    " The price on the proposal is for the full season which is approximately six months. That price will be broken down to six monthly payments."
    Better prepare ourselves to prepare? Fixin to get ready to prepare, are ya? How about something like,
    "Please return the proposal to me at your earliest convenience to be included in our schedule for the busy season ahead."
    Huh? I think you could safely drop this "sentence." So, let's see what we have so far...
    "The proposal, attached with this letter, is to allow us to agree on what services are going to be performed at the property.
    The proposal for seasonal lawn care covers weekly lawn cutting, trimming and blowing. The price on the proposal is for the full season which is approximately six months. That price will be broken down to six monthly payments.
    Please return the proposal to me at your earliest convenience to be included in our schedule for the busy season ahead."
    Short and sweet. Less is more. Just my opinion. YMMV
    Crawdad

    payup
     
  4. Lawn-Scapes

    Lawn-Scapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,810

    I recommend you show them in person instead of sending a letter... especially the first year you are presenting them. Call each of your customers and schedule an appointment to go over the services they may or may not need for the upcoming season. You will probably end up with a higher sales percentage this way. This is how I did it last year and it was very successful. This year I mail them all... and regret doing so. I've only received 1/3 back so far and they were due 2 days ago. :(

    Good luck!
     
  5. LawnsRUsInc.

    LawnsRUsInc. LawnSite Senior Member
    from midwest
    Posts: 916

    I wanted to thank you for your insite. It is greatly appreciated and i will be changing all of the things. And wow!! crawdad thanks for taking and breaking it down for me, that was ver very nice.

    Sincerely jason
     
  6. Lawn-Scapes

    Lawn-Scapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,810

    PS.. Why do you limit yourself to mowing, trimming and blowing? I recommend you offer a few more services unless you don't want to.. clean-up, mulching, hedge trimming, weeding, edging, etc..

    Thanks for the email. You're welcome.
     
  7. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    i edited you text in the above quote, excuse any spelling errors i did a quickie job. maybe work from what i wrote, but add in a few things...your phone number, maybe a nice opening line and closing line, etc...

    and good idea to post that here, so we can do some proof reading for ya.;)

    in the future i would have someone look over your written correspondence with clients. or just post it here again. your writing is a bit rough around the edges.
     
  8. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    oh yeah, date the letter, put your info at the top, and if you can personalize each letter for each customer, with address written on the letter. their name too.

    and remember there are templates available for sale here that you could use for all your letters, etc. makes your life easier.
     
  9. crawdad

    crawdad LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    Good job, Bubble Boy. I like your version better than mine. Do you think he should show them in person, as Lawn-Scapes said? This way, anything unclear to the customer can be explained.
    Crawdad
     
  10. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    thx, craw;)

    you know i do think an in person visit is best, with a caveat-how many are we talking?

    i believe this is the first year for contracts for LawnsRus, not the first yr in biz. His client base may be a bit much for a visit for each. could be quite a few days, or weeks of driving around.

    we eliminated the in person visit ourself last spring. we do postage stamps so to visit even just one crews customers to resign would mean over 100 visits. say you visit 10 per day (as if!) thats two weeks. then the next crew...

    heck when would clean ups get done?

    last yr we mailed letters with contracts.

    this yr gonna cut back work even more-if a customer is in good standing with us, and in our eyes trustworthy we will forgo contract. they are of course free to have one. but if they don't want one, we will just work out services over the phone, with prices. maybe send a letter confirming. no signing, making a copy, no visits, less paperwork etc.

    could be trouble, so i am prepared for the odd prob. it's just that we are at the point that a few probs would be less trouble than the pain of visiting every customer at a time when we are trying to get new ones signed, and do clean ups.

    say we get a grand in bad debt from the exercise. we save days of legwork.

    we'll see how it goes.
     

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