Contract help

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by AMAC, Dec 5, 2003.

  1. AMAC

    AMAC LawnSite Member
    from MO
    Posts: 101

    I am in need of some sample commercial contracts, I have been in the field for two years but I do not have a detailed contract. I am sure a lot of you guys were in my shoes at one time. Help is appreciated. e-mail MAC052574@YAHOO.COM
     
  2. Team Gopher

    Team Gopher LawnSite Platinum Member
    from -
    Posts: 4,041

  3. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    I too am in need of some good help with regards to commercial contracts. I have just finished re-writing the 4th version of my contracts for residential. So far, all of my accounts are residential.

    I'd really love to start getting into some commercial business. I think there may even be better money with commercial. If not better money, at least it would be steady work during the winter because most commercial accounts are overseeded.

    The problem for me is, all too often, the shape of the lot is nothing at all like a residential property. Islands of grass with more edging & blowing are real common. I just have zero idea how to price this stuff and I have almost zero idea how to write a contract for it. Nor do I have any experience with overseeding rye, which is a must in the north Texas area for commercial.

    I guess one thing that commercial contracts have, that residentials usually don't, is a term of at least 12 months.

    Let me know if you find anything out on this.

    I think I could get my foot in the door fairly easily with the commercial decision makers as I have a degree in Landscape Contracting from Oklahoma State.

    Later,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     
  4. idugaholez

    idugaholez LawnSite Member
    Posts: 42

    guys,

    I had contracts made up five years ago. I used to work for another contractor, and remembered what they had on them. However, currently I am seeing an attorney for a different reason (a customer owes me $26,000 and decided not to pay), and he has seen my contracts. He stated that they certainly need to be updated, and have to have more legal jargon. My advice is to spend the couple of bucks, and go have an attorny write it up for you. He is going to know the laws that apply to your area.

    Doug
     
  5. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    ++++He stated that they certainly need to be updated, and have to have more legal jargon. My advice is to spend the couple of bucks, and go have an attorny write it up for you. He is going to know the laws that apply to your area.++++

    I'd guess that if you're doing installs on commercial properties and are routinely running into jobs that exceed the amounts allowed in small claims courts, yes. Probably worth while. If the defendant can make it worth his while to hire an attorney over the dollar amounts, it probably makes a lot of sense to have an attorney help you write the contracts.

    As for me, my focus is on maintenance. It would almost certainly never happen that a customer would get the opportunity to stiff me by more than the amount allowed in small claims court.

    I'd seriously doubt that not having legal jargon on the contract would hurt your cause in a small claims court.

    Later,
    DFW Area Landscaper
     

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