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contract marketing idea!

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by jjfehr, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. jjfehr

    jjfehr LawnSite Member
    Posts: 76

    This is just a quick idea I had while reading a recent thread!
    What about an add that reads something like this......
    Weekly lawn mowing service from* $15.00 per week!
    call "blah blah blah" lawn service
    *prices are per contract

    The draw would obviously be the price.
    Now for the catch.... if you have a minimun charge of $25 and work on a 30 week season for mowing, the total is $750. The per contract part is so you have billing spread over an entire year, 52 weeks, or $14.42 per week rounded to $15.00.

    What does everyone think about this marketing aproach?
    I know that billing in this fasion has beed discussed in the past, I was just wondering what everyone thought of this marketing approach.
  2. KirbysLawn

    KirbysLawn Millenium Member
    Posts: 3,486

    Nope, too cheap. You are basically financing their service for the remainder of the year at a low price just to get volume at ZERO interest.

    I do contracts, $35 is usually the min per week. Try this, add fertilizing or sell your contract as if they are paying for all fertilizing services in the off season. My customers understand the charges for mowing during the season are for the mowing being done. Any fertilizing or weed controlled are paid for during the off season, most everyone likes and understands thsi concept, and fertilizer is cheap! I have 3 new customers that started last month, I winterized, took soil samples, stopped by last week and sprayed for weeds, and hit the driveway's with round-up. It cost me maybe $25 per yard over the last 2 months and I have made $155/$160/$135 per yard per month just on these new customers just by marketing is this fashion.
  3. If you go fishing for customers on price, you're not going to like what you catch.


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