Contract "Wording"

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by srqlawn, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. srqlawn

    srqlawn LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 45

    Sorry if this has been asked before.... Does anyone have a good contract template for commercial accounts. Something with good terms and provisions, lawyer b.s., etc. Just trying not to re-create the wheel here. Any help appreciated.


    Brad
    Lawngroup, LLC
     
  2. Roger

    Roger LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,927

    This is what attorneys get paid to write.

    Not to single out here, but this question is asked often. Somehow the idea of value of intellectual property is missed in these discussions. The correct wording of a contract that is useful, and offers the kinds of T&C that are applicable for your situation, recognizes the laws that pertain to your area, etc, has value. Why would anybody want to give it away?

    There is a current thread about customers wanting to borrow equipment. The overwhelming drift of the responses is "no!" If people are unwilling to give others their equipment to use, why would anybody give away intellectual property in the form of a contract? I don't get it.
     
  3. srqlawn

    srqlawn LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 45

    I respect what you are saying, but I wouldn't necessarily consider "terms and conditions" in a contract as intellectual property. Just my opinion..... plus I pay enough to attorneys as it is.
     
  4. Roger

    Roger LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,927

    If you don't know the applicable laws in your locality for which you need protection, then you need to pay somebody who does know them. That is the role of an attorney -- understanding the laws, knowing how they apply for a specific situation. Why isn't this of some value to you?

    Many of the documents that have been published on LS are a far cry from an contract. They merely spell out what work is to be done, how much the cost will be, when the payments are due. They rarely contain the language for the real value of a binding contract. If you just want a letter of understanding, that should be easy to draft for you. If you want something with teeth that recognizes the specifics of your business, and your location (laws are unique to location), then you need to work with somebody who is rightfully schooled and experienced in drafting such documents.

    Again, not singling out here, but sooooo many threads speak about the LCO being the professional, and should be paid as such for the knowledge and skill being brought to the business situation. But, when it comes to lawyers or accounts, or others in a professional capacity, the door comes down, "... don't want to pay."
     
  5. srqlawn

    srqlawn LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 45

    Your right on the money there. I appreciate the comments.
     
  6. SilkKnitter

    SilkKnitter LawnSite Member
    from Zone 5
    Posts: 57

  7. srqlawn

    srqlawn LawnSite Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 45

    Thanks......
     

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