Converting from indexing valve to electric

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ammodave, May 13, 2007.

  1. ammodave

    ammodave LawnSite Member
    from nw fl
    Posts: 3

    Here in Fl indexing valves (KRain, Fimco, etc.) are commonly used in conjunction with lawn pumps for home systems. With the shortage of rain, well levels are getting lower resulting in a drop of pump output pressure so the indexers are not as reliable as they were when originally installed. I need to convert an existing Fimco indexer to electric valves (and install a pump relay and controller). To simplify the piping, I'm considering leaving the Fimco manifold in place (after removing the internal rotary indexer) and just installing the valves below ground level in the distribution lines. Anybody ever taken this approach? Can I expect a pressure loss by running the pump output through the empty Fimco valve body? Comments?
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    Contact FIMCO and see if you can't retrofit the valve for lower flows.
     
  3. ammodave

    ammodave LawnSite Member
    from nw fl
    Posts: 3

    The valve already has the low flow indexer installed. That was the first attempt to resolve the problem. The indexer can be made to work properly if a small amt of city water is introduced into the system upstream of the indexer but it won't operate just on pump pressure alone.
     
  4. Remote Pigtails

    Remote Pigtails LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 581

    I would cut the fimco out and just install the valves. What is the issue that makes you want to leave it with empty guts?
     
  5. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    You still have a pressure loss in a gutted FIMCO, and you will increase the loss by adding electric valves. A more labor-intensive idea is to add another suction point for the shallow well. The depth of the water table figures into this, since it might be deep enough to require a different pump setup (changing from shallow-well to deep-well)

    By the way, do you know that there aren't any suction problems, like a clogged point? Have you tried another workaround, that being trying smaller nozzles in the heads? There must be some way to work with the ground water you now have. A more powerful pump might make a difference.
     
  6. ammodave

    ammodave LawnSite Member
    from nw fl
    Posts: 3

    OK I'm convinced, the Fimco must go. Leaving it in place was just a thought to avoid dealing with the pipe rerouting.
     

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