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core areator design

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by flyboy03, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. flyboy03

    flyboy03 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    does anyone know of a core areator that is designed to operate properly? from what i have discovered there needs to be at least 15 to 20 holes per square foot to be effective. some research indicates that even more holes of up to 40 per square foot is needed. just want to make the right purchase on the second try, anyone interesed in the purchase of a spiker....spikers are good for sandy soil i have read. some manfacturers i have contacted about holes per square foot seem to be in the dark about this and don't even know how many holes their machine produce... thanks :help:
  2. Mo Green

    Mo Green LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,487

    I think the best way to achieve that many holes is to go over the yard more than once. I have not seen an aerator that will pull that many plugs in one pass. The best way is to alter your pattern on each pass with the aerator.
  3. all ferris

    all ferris LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,307

    Don't tell the customer they need 25 holes per sqf. lol
  4. archie

    archie LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    40 holes per square foot? I think we've crossed the line from aeration to cultivation!

    The average walk behind aerator will give you about 7 holes per square foot. The Ryan LA-28 will give you 12 on the first pass and 16 on the second. I think after 16 holes per sq ft you're not gaining any further benefits. You mostly punching holes into holes.

    The LA-28 is probably the best walk behinid that I know of. If you need a trailer type... sorry I haven't done the research since the lawns I do are not that big.

    Good luck
  5. flyboy03

    flyboy03 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    at 96 holes per square foot this ryan unit seems to be the ticket......... In general, turf responds best when aeration holes are close together and deep. The Ryan GA-60 can be configured to meet a variety of hole-spacing and depth requirements. The eight aeration heads of the GA-60 hold three tines each. The optional "quinttine" holder produces a fight, 2.5- by 3.5-inch coring pattern that produces 96 holes per square foot at up to four-inch depth.

    here is the link...http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BSK/is_4_11/ai_89645293/pg_2 :blob3:
  6. archie

    archie LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    Wow, 96 holes per square foot. Impressive! I'm guessing that would be with the smallest 1/4 tines.

    I'm not sure what your purposes are but keep in mind that this is a turf aerator desgned for golfcourse fairways and the such. It seems a little overkill for the residential market but I suppose if you have the right type of properties and can justify the $25,000 or so price tag then it would be great. The more holes the better.

    For residential/commercial lawns the best I have seen is the LA-28 (12 holes per square foot) or the tow-behind Ryan 3 Point Hitch LawnAire (18 holes/sf). Lawn aerators (as opposed to professional turf aerators) generally have tines 3/4 inch wide and cannot produce the same amount of holes as the golf course equipment. Spikers only add to problems of compaction but I guess you already found that our the hard way :)

    Anyway, good luck with whatever you choose. Here is the link to Ryan's stuff, if you need it.

  7. Mlc gmc03

    Mlc gmc03 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 324

    i picked up a classen at the expo last week and i am not sure what they say it does per sqft but i am more than pleased with it, the split drive is very nice. it is very easy to use, there is no pickin up like with the traditional type units the tines never come out of the ground until your done with the yard
  8. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    The number of holes does not mean a lot by itself. You must consider what you are trying to accomplish. I have seen production outfits aerating with tines so worn that they just dent the surface - lot easier on the operator, LOL.

    If you are using a drum type, walk behind machine, it is pulling itself through the turf, and is giving a fair aeration on one pass by fracturing the soil profile to the depth of the tines, at least. More than once, I have run my Ryan LA-4 over soils compacted so badly that tines only penetrate ½" on first pass, with weight bar and water filled drum. But the second pass was full penetration - the action of the machine pulling itself thru the lawn softened the whole profile. Pull or push rolling types will not give this effect - they are just punching holes while another machine moves them.

    If using a cam-type, reciprocating machine, you are just punching holes, and will not achieve the total loosening of a drum type. One exception is the Verti-Drain, which gives a kick at the bottom of the plunge - but I've never seen one used except on sports turf - a pricey machine. But cam type will give deeper penetration than rolling type.

    Only time you really need to worry about number of holes would be if you are trying to correct heavy thatch. In that case, you want to pull up as much soil as possible. I handle that by making as many passes as the lawn can handle without damage. Most fairly healthy lawns can handle 4 passes: I can make 2 passes in same direction, putting tines in between holes for 2nd pass, then do two diagonals. Tried a 5th pass on my front yard once - only got 5' and quit - looked like tilling. LOL.
  9. bushtrimmer

    bushtrimmer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 351

    Last year @ Expo, Classen had a hydro ride on aerator they were going to get into production. Did they have that there and are they producing it. It looked awesome and still fits through gates.
  10. bushtrimmer

    bushtrimmer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 351

    I've heard arguments that a drum type actually compacts the ground on the front and back of the tine, which is a slight disadvantage. I think you need a little vibratory action to shatter the ground.
    How do cam-type machines work in yards with roots. Will the machine withstand the abuse it will receive like the Lawnaire 4 or 5?

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