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Corn Gluten Data??

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by upidstay, May 31, 2007.

  1. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,280

    Does anybody have, or know of, any university studies done on Corn Gluten as a pre-emergant?

    Not really interested in anybody's personal experiences with it, just hard, empirical data done at a university.

    Thanks
     
  2. Nathan Robinson

    Nathan Robinson LawnSite Senior Member
    from 47712
    Posts: 317

    Purdue did one. Two State chemists ago from there was actually the guy who discovered this. It has the longest effect for pre-m activity.
    www.entm.purdue.edu
     
  3. Came out of Iowa state U, so they must have plenty of data...research

    But why would you use cgm for crab control on cool season turfgrass... I've believe you need 20-40lbs/m for several years to get somewhere like 80% control, and with the nitrogen content at 10%, man, that's alot of spring n, in fact more n than I apply in one complete season

    Now warm season turfgrass, would be an option
     
  4. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,842

    Hi upidstay........corn gluten meal has been tested for years here at Iowa State where it was originally developed. We attend their annual "field day", and they test several pre-emergent products annualy. Bottom line: corn glutten meal is expensive and is no more effective than pre-M, Barricade, Dimension, etc. You can tap on to Iowa State University and find out their field test results, but I personally do not recommend corn gluten meal. Sounds nice, but............
     
  5. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    But its organic spring N, slower release, no or little salt content, you shouldn't get the same disease pressure using organic N as you would putting down 2-4 lbs of synthetic N. The real drawback is the price IMO, especially for the labeled product.
     
  6. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643

    Too much N is Tim's sticking point regarding CGM. It's all slow release and is a metered process.

    Check out some threads from early '06 regarding CGM. It hurts for me to re-read some of the crap I posted.
     
  7. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,842

    Organic means nothing in respect to safety. In fact, it is dead wrong. "Natural organics" commonly contain contaminants that most people do not know about. Natural organics require more product, often smell bad, are usually more costly, and contain contaminents & viral organisms. The "good-doers" with lawns full of creeping Charlie do not know about nature like they would like you to know -- otherwise they would use the most advanced product they could get they hands on.
     
  8. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    umm... ok american, why don't you tell me how you really feel, no seriously don't hold back.
    lol...
    I would like to get a response from Tim, so I can understand his position better. Natty I read all that stuff a couple years ago, I didn't agree with it then, but I kept out of it to see where it went, however I'm intrigued if that is what Tim is thinking, that disease pressure would be a problem.
     
  9. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643


    Please get off your high horse and do some research. The fertilizer industry is heavily regulated and if organic fert contained contaminants something would be done about it. As far as safety goes, nothing is 100% safe. The fact that you bring that up shows that you need to do some research.

    Funny you bring up nature or natural and creeping charlie. Where is it natural to have a 100% weed free lawn?

    As abrasive as NathanRobinson was when he first got here, it looks like he's right about alot of the 30 year experience guys. You rely on your experience and defense from other members rather than on what you know. You still have the same opinions on stuff from 20 years ago. Organics are bad and contain viral diseases. Come on. Adapt with the times and learn something new. I forgot, you switched to Chaser Ultra II and can't kill small braodleafs with the PG Ultra!

    I'd like to say Congrats to am-lawn on becoming a senior member! It only took 400 of the same post over and over again!

    I'm sure this post will be edited or deleted, but some of this (including some of my own posts) is ridiculous.
     
  10. Some die hard organic user won't use some bio solids due to the heavy metal content that may be present in some of them

    Yes, My program does use organic fert and sythetic fert....usually called bridged or fortified organic

    Pro lawn....More on my position on nitrogen later
     

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