Correct/Successful way to land a Commercial Account?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by SSmith, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. SSmith

    SSmith Banned
    Posts: 447

    How do you go about properly identifying, approaching, and closing a commercial account?? There are so many solicitors out there these days that I imaginge you need to set yourself apart from all the riff-raff to even get your foot in the door. What do you guys do that has been successful? Thanks.
     
  2. SSmith

    SSmith Banned
    Posts: 447

    No replies to this yet???
     
  3. jccordes2

    jccordes2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 124

    I'm not an expert in this area, but what i've learned from this website and what I plan to do this next spring is:

    Send out a formal introduction letter, including hightlights such as, Insured, professional, dependable, affordable, quality and etc......

    Follow up with a phone call to the propery manager, ask when and how you can submit a bid, and what it would take to earn there business. introduce the services you can offer/what they need.
    maybe ask the likes and dislike of there current/former LCO's

    after sending bid, follow up again with: "what will it take to earn there business" (with out dropping your prices to rock bottom)

    I've been researching a lot of company's I would like to bid on next spring. I have a list of addresses, and a list of who makes the grounds keeping decisions finacially, (who can decide on what bid to accept).
    once spring comes, let the letters/phones calls begin.

    I think the key in this business aside from a good quality cut is the ability to sell your services and your self/company.

    after all, we are in sales aren't we??
     
  4. SSmith

    SSmith Banned
    Posts: 447

    I also have a letter drafted and ready to be mailed out. I have the addresses of the businesses I want to go after but I do not have th ename of the person in charge. I guess I'll have to call them up and get that info. so the letter can be addressed to that person. Thanks for mentioning that.
     
  5. jccordes2

    jccordes2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 124

    I think just sending a letter to the business may not go very far, I think it's important to have the decision makers name on it. I'm sure I left a few minor details out, like having a professional estimate/quoting paperwork, I'm starting to work on that now.
     
  6. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    1) walk in the business and tell them you want their work

    2) ask them how cheap you need to be

    3) agree to do it for the price they tell you to do it for
     
  7. SSmith

    SSmith Banned
    Posts: 447

    "ask them how cheap you need to be"


    I get what you're saying but the "c" word doesn't exist in my vocabulary. I assume most commercial accounts, besides high rent condos/apts and office buildings, are more interested in just getting the grass cut and not so much quality.....In that case lowballing their current price may not be that bad if it is profitable enough for you.
     
  8. SodKing

    SodKing LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,648

    You have enough business clientele to back up your high prices? Businesses want to see a company that can prove they are responsible, do quality work, and have the expertise to address all their concerns. Commercial work can be either high paying for highly visible properties or low bid. The person picking you want to make sure he doesn't screw himself because he picked someone who didn't live up to expectations.

    Its one thing to be high priced. Its nice when you can justify being high priced, but you have to have the resume to back up your reputation.
     
  9. SSmith

    SSmith Banned
    Posts: 447

    "Commercial work can be either high paying for highly visible properties or low bid. The person picking you want to make sure he doesn't screw himself because he picked someone who didn't live up to expectations."


    I'm pretty sure my previous post agreed with this response.
     

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