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crabgrass is winning

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by BostonBull, Jul 17, 2010.

  1. ChiTownAmateur

    ChiTownAmateur LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 386

    Once it's complete it will take under 15 minutes a week to sweep across and pull any newbies that come up.

    I know it's not the organic way but put some water down on that tiny plot. It'll bring it out of dormancy and give it a better chance to spread and dig deep roots.

    To be a good steward you could water say 1x a week about 1 or 1-1/2 inch...that is a very small amount of water for that plot.
  2. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    Since nobody else commented on your picture I will. You have a beautiful lawn.
  3. RDA

    RDA LawnSite Member
    Posts: 177

    Thanks, I appreciate the feedback, it looks quite a bit better than when I bought the house (different angle but you can get an idea what the yard looked like in 2006 just three years earlier in the picture attached below). The yard was full of weeds and bare spots. The yard is now 99% weed free and I have to do very little to keep the weeds out as the grass is much more healthy now. I ripped out all of the landscaping front, back, sides and islands and redid that as well, I actually did that before addressing the lawn.

    Right now, due to the lack of rain (and I only spot water a few area to keep them from going completely dormant), the yard is not quite as nice as it is in the Fall/Spring but still nicer than most yards, even a couple that have irrigation systems as their cultural practices stink.



    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  4. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    I too use very little chemicals on my lawn...a few spot treatments is all that's required. My lawn is not an organic lawn, but I do practice best management practices. I have created such a dense stand of bermuda that weeds are rarely a problem...I do have some crabgrass that pops through from time to time but its not a problem to spot treat.

    About organic, I topdressed my lawn last season with cow manure and it looked great.
    Posted via Mobile Device
  5. RDA

    RDA LawnSite Member
    Posts: 177

    That is interesting as I use so few chemicals now even I am surprised. I have about 1/2 acre of grass and I have used only 1 gallon of mixed "Q4" this year. I occasionally get a few dandelions, clover, chickweed, oxalis and occasional other random weeds (hardly any crabgrass despite all of my neighbors having crabgrass in their yards).

    I too would not call myself "organic" but I do try to use very good practices, specifically, I mow my TTTF at 3.0" - 4.0" (depends on what point in the season), I now dethatch/aerate/topdress/overseed in the Fall, I either hand pull weeds or spot treat, and I am fertilizing with organic/compost based fertilizers. Last year was the first year I top dressed, I used cow manure. This year I plan to use Sweet Peat.

    I have seen the pics of your Bermuda, it looks very good, beautiful really and I appreciate many of your posts.

    Sorry for the threadjack.


  6. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    Cut heights play a large part in grass health and amount of weeds for sure. Next season I want to try some pelletized chicken manure instead of conventional fertilizers and see how my lawn looks...its a good bit more expensive per 1k than synthetic fert but since I was happy with the cow manure top dress I am excited to try it.

    Thanks for the compliment on my bermuda...I have spent countless hours working on it...it is my hobby.
    Posted via Mobile Device
  7. basic lawn

    basic lawn LawnSite Member
    from nj
    Posts: 50

    I have found to be an excellent way to pull many weeds.
    One of the few organic products I can endorse for free...No bending required. I am a landscaper, but if the company reads this and wants to pay me for endorsement, I could use the money!
  8. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    One of my customers accidentally stumbled upon one of the greatest organic
    ALL vegetation killers when there was some kind of a problem with the hot water heater,
    evidently an amount of scalding hot water leaked out (I assume 140 degrees).

    As to how exactly one would go about applying this, lets not forget the stuff is dangerous
    as it could cause first, second, and perhaps third degree burns so this would have to be left
    up to individual choice.

    But this non-selective planticider works better than round-up, I kid you not scalding hot water
    kills plants D.E.A.D. be it weed or else, hot water it's gone.

    Thought I'd share as much.
  9. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Steam Cleaner anyone?
  10. HayBay

    HayBay LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 846

    Ammonium Soaps of fatty acids, Vinegar, Hot Water, Steam do not kill the root of the plant, thus regrowth occurs. Multiple applications are required. 4-5

    Hand picking/mechanical removal is always an option but tedious in larger areas.

    Very nice lawn RDA.

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