crabgrass' little secret

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Keegan, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Keegan

    Keegan LawnSite Senior Member
    from CT
    Posts: 606

  2. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,599

    Thanks for that Keegan.
     
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    The page can not be displayed... Did it say something of interest???
     
  4. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    Link doesn't work from an iphone. So what's the deal?
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    That's why discussion and evaluation is a good thing for Forums,,, rather than dropping URLs that are not available to everyone... :)
     
  6. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,599

    From Science Daily:

    June 26, 2013 — Contrary to popular belief, crabgrass does not thrive in lawns, gardens and farm fields by simply crowding out other plants. A new study in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has found that the much-despised weed actually produces its own herbicides that kill nearby plants.

    Chui-Hua Kong and colleagues point out that crabgrass is not only a headache for lawns and home gardens, but also a major cause of crop loss on farms. Scientists long suspected, but had a hard time proving, that the weed thrived by allelopathy. From the Greek "allelo-," meaning "other," and "-pathy," meaning "suffering," allelopathy occurs when one plant restricts the growth of another by releasing toxins. They set out to determine if crabgrass has this oppressive ability.

    Kong's team isolated three chemicals from crabgrass that affect the microbial communities in nearby soil and did indeed inhibit the growth of staple crops wheat, corn and soybeans. "The chemical-specific changes in [the] soil microbial community generated a negative feedback on crop growth," the scientists said, noting that the chemicals also would have a direct toxic effect on other plants.

    The authors acknowledge funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China.
     
  7. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    Thanks for posting that article... It may help to explain the difficulty I've had getting new grass to start in the dead areas from the drought last year... the drought killed grass and CG took over for the remainder of the season and I got little of nothing to germinate from the Fall seeding or the Dormant backup seeding...
    I've been thinking about the necessity to possibly killing the CG earlier in the season before too much allelopathy occurs...
     
  8. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,599

    Add organic matter now to rebuild the microbiology.
     
  9. Victorsaur

    Victorsaur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 81

  10. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    "... Kong's team isolated three chemicals from crabgrass that affect the microbial communities in nearby soil and did indeed inhibit the growth of staple crops wheat, corn and soybeans. "The chemical-specific changes in [the] soil microbial community generated a negative feedback on crop growth," the scientists said, noting that the chemicals also would have a direct toxic effect on other plants."

    So the allelopathy is directed SOLELY at the microbes, not a general herbicides to actual plants...

    Now I'm curious ,,, what is the "negative feedback" all about???
    The addition of compost may not even overcome that 'negative feedback' and end up being contaminated itself...
    Interesting...
     

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