Creative Block

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by White Gardens, May 13, 2009.

  1. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

  2. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    Last edited: May 13, 2009
  3. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

  4. JDiepstra

    JDiepstra LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    Why don't you post the picture. I'm not going through the trouble of opening up all those files.
     
  5. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    I've been having problems converting back to a jpg. file to show up like a pic. I'll see what I can do.
     
  6. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    Document_1.jpg

    Metz3c_1.jpg

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    Metz5c_1.jpg

    Document_1.jpg

    Metz3c_1.jpg

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  7. jg244888

    jg244888 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    what software you use???
     
  8. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,740

    I understand your leaning toward symetry on the porch, but you might want to experiment with the idea of having just the corner plants be different. The rest of the house and property makes me want to have something more upright on the right and less so on the left.

    Another thing you might want to experiment with is to push back the planting to the right of the porch. Planting out to the walk all the way is setting up an even view all the way across, not necessarilly a bad thing. If you pushed the planting back (maybe keep 4 or 5' of lawn on the other side of the walk) on that side it would visually advance the symetric part of the house giving some depth to the overall appearance. Just some things to experiment with.

    You might even try three of the same shrubs in front of each side of the porch as a different look to the on in front with two others behind.
     
  9. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    I will have to agree with your post 100% AGLA.

    1.) I always do lean towards symmetry. In this situation you are right as in I can play around as the house is in the country, and the first impression you get is the space to the right. (Design image with short wall) So ultimately that is the spot the eye will be drawn to first. It's not like you have people walking down a sidewalk looking directly in front of the house. One other thing, The grade from right to left throws off the symmetry and that's something that can't be fixed.

    2.) Take a look at the second pic I uploaded a shot showing the amount of space I have to work with when the bushes are gone. If I'm understanding you correctly, I will be able to push the plantings back from the sidewalk leaving a little more room. It's sometimes hard to see actual depth perception from certain angles. I would have like to do a design with that pic but the angle was too sharp for me to effectively remove the bushes from the pic.

    3.) I like the three bushes idea. I'm a big advocate of using sets of 3 or 5. (odd numbers) Things just seem to look better that way. I just wasn't sure with the spirea if I was going to have enough room for three. If I pick the right variety, I should be OK.

    4.) Also for the earlier post, The program is Landscape Pro.

    All in all, I'm trying to have fun with the fact that this is a 110 year old house and the bricks were hand made locally. I like properties with history.

    I talk to the client tonight. She likes the idea of the spireas in the front. I also added a Blue Spruce to the right. I like that color in there.

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  10. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,740

    You have plenty of room unless you are staying within the confines of those blocks. Your mock ups are not showing grass on the other side of the walk, so I'm assuming that you are not. Try pulling the middle of the three out forward a bit and the other two back a bit. Use the triangular voids of those spaces in front and to the outside of those two set backed plants for smaller plants or seasonal color.

    I would like to see something a bit bigger back next to the porch on the left (rhodi, perhaps) in order to keep the corner planting in front of something. Without it, you want to look into the back yard, so it weakens the balance of the whole thing.

    I would not use a top grafted plant on the corner, but something a little more meaty. The reasoning is that you show a vertical line of its trunk and still see the vertical line of the edge of the house. Usually, you want to interupt that hiuse line in order to "tuck in" the house to the ground.
     

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