Cross connect requirements for drip system

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by john_incircuit, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. john_incircuit

    john_incircuit LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 309

    We are primarily grass cutters, not irrigation installers. For my own yard, I want to go ahead and use the downtime to install a small drip irrigation system. This system will be fairly basic, 300 feet of ½ inch hose, drip emitters and the ¼ inch feeders.

    My primary question is about the cross connect requirements. I calculated the water consumption, checked the pressure and plan to connect the system to my outside water faucet as needed (via a basic check valve, pressure reducer and water filter). The check valve is one of the $5 plastic “orbit” back flow preventers.

    In our area, all sprinkler systems need an approved, double check valve backflow setup, but they connect directly to the street main. What about a drip system that connects temporarily, via garden hose, to the existing outside water faucet?

    Thanks for the help!!
     
  2. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 25,538

    you can do it that way but by law you should realy have a better backflow preventer then what you plan on using.
     
  3. Call your local water purveyor and talk with the cross connection control manager and ask what their requirements are for your situation....
     
  4. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

  5. Hank Reardon

    Hank Reardon LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 599

    Ditto, install to code.
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I would agree with DW. No different than connecting a hose to the hose bib, therefore hose bibb vac break should suffice. I suppose if you want to be safe, check with the city.
     
  7. john_incircuit

    john_incircuit LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 309

    I want to do it to code, no question. I assume this means that the code does not distinguish if I tap into the street connection or the outside faucet? If this is correct, what type of back flow prevention are built into the dishwasher or washing machine for example?
     
  8. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I believe most codes do distinguish between the two, the latter only requiring a hose bibb vac break. I personally have not seen any other requirement on a hose bibb, but then there are places like Suffolk Co. where upside down is right side up and double checks are considered suitable for hazardous cross connection control.
     
  9. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    dishwashers use an air gap on the drain line, and usually no back flow at all on the positive line.
     
  10. Hank Reardon

    Hank Reardon LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 599

    That's why I was supporting LR's suggestion to call your water purveyor and get what the requirements. Using the item DW posed might be acceptable in some places, it wouldn't be here where I live.
     

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