CT GVWR Laws and when do you need a CDL

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by CutRight, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. GravelyNut

    GravelyNut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,594

     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  2. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Lets try to get the quote tags right. ;)

    Why would you be concerned about another states CDL rules? You yourself said this.

    I have already pointed out to you that you are confusing the 2 different definitions of CMV. NOT all CMV's need a CDL.

    Do you think you need a CDL for everything used in commerce with a GCWR over 10k?

    What about the flow chart that was previously posted? Is that wrong too?

    AGAIN that is incorrect. NOT all commercial vehicles need a CDL.

    Try using the flow chart.

    You don't say. :dizzy:

    A kink:laugh: You obviously have no comprehension of what you are reading.

    A "F" Endorsement is for farm use :rolleyes:

    So again please tell me how the flow chart and post #52 are wrong.
     
  3. GravelyNut

    GravelyNut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,594

    Because Ohio and Florida are states that I will have a CDL from. Currently Florida but it will be transfered to Ohio within a couple years. So there is the concern for those two. Now why are you concerned about Ohio's if you don't live there. ;)


    In some states, yes. Search the web and you'll find where NC got a guy for it in 2004. $300 fine said he did as did the judge. NY has an under 26K CDL Class A license.

    Book vs state laws. State Laws win if stricter than the Fed's for those who have that state's license or tags. The book was copied from the Fed sample manual. Go to dmv.org and some of the manuals only have the covers changed while it says sample manual on other pages. Which when some states copied them, had a flaw in the flowchart. The Feds got it wrong on the very first line dropping down from the first box. If the NY book was right as you believe, then you wouldn't have the NY CDL Class A with 01 Restrictions.

    Read the section quoted again.
    Note the comma between the Class A and Class C with an F , the word "or" and the comma after the part about the non-CDL Class C. The A Class restricted doesn't say F. It says "02" is going to "01" Restriction and CDL Class A weight ratings are normally over 26K. No mention of that Class A being F restricted.

    Same applies to your failure to note the ":" in NY's way of determining which is the heavier weight to go by. The : means this, what follows are the choices. They further broke it down under the MFG's ratings to a choice of GVWR or GCWR. So if the GCWR is higher than the GVWR, they can use it.

    is the NY definition of the 01 restriction. Shouldn't even be needed because it isn't over 26K by your thinking. But it's there. So back to your post 47, CA isn't the only state with odd licenses.
     
  4. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    What's with your fetish with NY then. I have no real concern for any of them except the falsities you post.

    If you were so sure of this you would post a link.

    NY has a "O1" Restriction which has nothing to do with this discussion.

    I never reference a dmv.org book/website. I only refer to each state's book/website.

    The flow chart still works for NY. The O1 restriction is to keep guys that get there class A with a pickup and trailer from driving class 8 tractor/truck and trailer. Not so sure what is hard for you to understand about that.

    See above.

    Your continued failure to read and comprehend basic English is getting tedious.

    I have never said/thought anything of the such.

    Here is the full O and O1 restriction.

    See explanation above.

    Again please tell how flow chart and post #52 are wrong.:dizzy:
     
  5. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Come to think about it, it does.

    IF NY was to require a class B CDL for the 19/8k example rig. They would have to allow a driver to test in that rig. (And that is set by the feds)

    If one were to get a class B with said rig it would then need a "O1" restriction to keep one from driving an over 26k straight truck. There isn't a "O1" restriction for class B.

    Same with air brakes.


    Again please tell how flow chart and post #52 are wrong
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  6. 360ci

    360ci LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 992

    I concur, class B doesn't require an air brake endorsements, mostly so it's less work to train drivers on air brakes and it lowers initial vehicle cost by going the hydraulic route. In Canada, all class 8 (A) vehicles are produced with air brakes due to weight restrictions.

    Everything, high prices, pessimistic people abound the sidewalks talking to themselves in total chaos about absolutely nothing important. Besides, I heard they got a Big Apple there! ...somewhere.
     
  7. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Not sure if I am following you. Most class B size trucks here have air brakes.
     
  8. R.L. Hale Landscaping LLC

    R.L. Hale Landscaping LLC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 24

    what i am not sure of is that if you need a cdl if the trailer is over 10,000 pounds even if your combined in under 26000.

    say a 9900 1 ton truck with a 12,000 pound trailer. combined 21,900. Dot #'s and medical is all you need?

    Its pretty clear that if you are over 26000 and towing over 10k trailer cdl A is required, but im not sure on towing over 10k trailer while being under 26k
     
  9. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    You need absolutely nothing, CDL wise that is.

    Correct

    See above.
     
  10. 360ci

    360ci LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 992

    Class 'B' here isn't a truck, it's a school bus license. GVWR doesn't surpass a class 7 weight rating, as 99% of all buses are single rear axle. With a class B, you can also drive a class F, or mini-bus, or coach bus which is also class C. Most coach companies want their drivers to have a B, as the B adds additional road training, such as railway crossings, etc. Almost all coach buses however have air brakes due to the weight of the vehicle.

    The licensing varies here from province to province, just as it does down there - state to state. There are a lot of federal regulations and endorsements so each province is on the same page with one another to narrow down complications for operators, and business owners alike.
     

Share This Page