ctl pushing in wet clay

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by tnmtn, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,019

    was curious if tracks make much diffrence when trying to backfill in clay. the clay is real gummy and sticks like none i've seen before. one pass and my tires were slicks. as of now the plan is to try and let it dry out or get colder and hopefully make it harder. just curious how the ctl guys handle the clay.
    take care,
    metin
     
  2. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    It will depend to some extent on the tread of the tracks and also on the characteristics of the travel pumps, but CTLs should work much better in the gumbo.

    I'll let the real-world answer...
     
  3. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,068

    I would think the best setup would be over the tire steel tracks for a wheeled machine. The clay can't stick to the angles of the steel as easy as it can to the rubber.
     
  4. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    I'm worried that with a conventional wheeled skid (no anti-stall), maybe except for the largest ones by Gehl, Deere, and Case, the clay would just kill the engine (if it's not too wet).

    And it might kick in the anti-stall system so early on Cats that the wheels just won't get any bite.
     
  5. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    The best way to backfill in muddy conditions is with a excavator and clean up bucket. You can place the material and keep the pressure from building up and blowing out the wall especially if its crappy cinder block walls.

    The less you churn up the mud the better I don't think I would want to be backfilling with clayish dirt you will always have problems with a wet basement.
     
  6. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Your an expert on masonry also?
     
  7. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    No I'am not a expert in masonary but I have seen pressure from too much weight against a newly built wall colasp.

    Cinder blocks are rarely used here for foundations its all poured concrete with rebar. Some house foundations take 22 yards of concrete for the average size house. Some foundations take 100 yards of material to backfill and 40 ton of boulders to build the area up and hold back the backfill to make the ground level and make it possible to work around the new foundation.
     
  8. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,019

    i was thinking steel tracks would be about the best way to go on this. looks like i'll be pushing it back in with the backhoe bucket tomorrow. it's not going to be fun the way this stuff sticks to the steel. the bucket stayed full after the first scoop digging it out. luckily it isn't backfilling for a wall. it is a 300' water line trench.
    take care,
    metin
     
  9. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    Thats not very good stuff to fill in a water line trench with I hope you bedding the pipe with ateast 12"s of sand. If the stuff is that sticky you will have voids in the the back fill and you will be fighting sink holes for the next year.
     
  10. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,068

    Yeah, that mud gets air pockets in it and never packs right. I really hate mud. You need a hoepac if you plan on decently compacting that much, smashing it with the bucket isn't going to do a whole lot of good. Get a machine with a hoepac and another with a bucket, toss the fill in the ditch with one machine, pack and go with the other. The really crappy part is that you're gonna have to be packing within 12" of the pipe, so what gravelrat said is correct, you're going to need bedding for at least the first 12", that way once you get far enough away from the pipe you can pack the hell out of it.
     

Share This Page