Dandelion Mycoherbicide

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by dan deutekom, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

    Has anyone seen, used or heard of the fungus Sclerotinia minor to control broadleaf weeds in turf. According to research at McGill University this fungus has been shown to be more effective and twice as fast as lawn herbicides containing 2,4-D, mecoprop and dicamba (Killex or Trikil or Par111). It is expected to be registered for commercial use in several years. Is this the breakthrough we are looking for?
     
  2. dvmcmrhp52

    dvmcmrhp52 LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Pa.
    Posts: 4,205

    Don't know a thing about it but I'll be listening and looking.
     
  3. Dchall_San_Antonio

    Dchall_San_Antonio LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 327

    Dan, do you have a link to the research?
     
  4. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

    Here is the link to the page that I found out about this
    http://wlapwww.gov.bc.ca/epd/epdpa/eripm/landshtm/Chap3.htm
    (interesting page on biocontrol) (the info you want is near the bottom of the page)

    What is totally frustrating is that my search of the web has given numerous mentions but no research or facts. Also this "registration in several years" seems to be taking longer than they thought considering that it was discovered in 1997. I have also found that there is a US patent on it as well.

    It was discovered by Dr. Watson at Mcgill university in Montreal but their is very little info there either :blob2:
     
  5. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

  6. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

  7. SWD

    SWD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 989

    The reason why Sclerotinia minor isn't popular in turfgrass agronomy is that Sclerotinia homoecarpa is commonly known as Dollar Spot.
    One typically tries to get rid of Dollar Spot.
    The biggest problem, and one the turfgrass breeders haven't completely gotten over, is disease and cultural pressure mutating the selected species.
    I am not a crop agronomist, therefore, how Sclerotinina minor effects crops may very well be different than how Sclerotinia homoecarpa effects turfgrass.
     
  8. Dchall_San_Antonio

    Dchall_San_Antonio LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 327

    In crops it is known as stem rot. That's about all I understood from my Internet "research."

    Here's another link...

    http://www.mcgill.ca/reporter/34/16/watson/

    Doesn't look like we'll be seeing it on the shelves soon.
     
  9. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

    We may not see it soon but at least there is a little hope on the horizon.
     
  10. KINGDOME

    KINGDOME LawnSite Member
    from ARIZONA
    Posts: 11

    YEA THAT WOULD BE GREAT BUT i'VE BEN IN THIS BALLGAME
    FOR ALOT OF YEARS AND HAVE FOUND OUT THAT IF SOMETHING
    SOUNDS TO GOOD TO BE TRUE THAN IT USUALLY IS , AND i'M
    NOT BEING NEGATIVE IT IS JUST THE WAY IT IS
    BUT IF SOMETHING DOES COME UP THAT SAVES TIME AND MONEY
    THEN i'LL BE THE FIRST TO SAY i'M WRONG AND TRY IT , k.z.
     

Share This Page