dead spots???

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by hobbsd, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. hobbsd

    hobbsd LawnSite Senior Member
    from west wi
    Posts: 448

    I have two customers that have 10 by 10 areas of grass that are thin but tolerable in the spring, but then they almost completely die out come mid summer.

    Both spots are around 10-15 ft. from trees, they have exact similar symptoms. I did a solid test on one of the sites, and the PH came back low, but I don't think that is the problem.

    Does anyone have similar problems? Can someone lend a helpful thought?

    Thank you.
  2. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866

    are they in the shade of those trees? How about the irrigation? Are you getting the same coverage there as the rest of the yard? or???
  3. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,231

    Dead spots near trees? Is it on the sunny side? (south)?
    We call this "Root burn" . It is caused by tree roots which reach out farther than the shade of the tree. In late summer or fall, the tree roots take out so much moisture the grass dies. Certain trees, like silver maple, are worse than others. It can be easily prevented with a little extra water. Does not happen in wet years or where the irrigation is good.
  4. hmartin

    hmartin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 590

    Anything buried there? Septic tank maybe? I have a line about 2' by 15' in my backyard where some excavation was done before I lived there. Every year the grass looks good in the spring, but by mid summer this grass is thin and dying.
  5. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    if you get some grass growing in those spots they wont be dead.
  6. stumper1620

    stumper1620 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,889

    I have dealt with a few with this type problem this year.
    Its thin anyway, so the damage you could do is minimal at best, what I would do is: Aerate & lime, wait a couple days (with lots of watering, this would also be a good time to trim as much as possible without destroying the tree to get more sun.) Apply starter fert. and seed it. keep moist until grown in. probably have a combination of compacted soil, lack of moisture, and maybe poa as the grass plant which dies off in the heat of summer. apply a pre emergent in August to prevent poa next season.
    JMO without seeing what you got.
    a complete soil analysis would tell what nutrients are needed.
  7. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,852

    Don't waste tour time on "soil tests" (so many idiots think there's something bad in their soil). You are dealing with an "old lawn". Improved cultivars will do well - unless heavy shade exists. Kentucky Bluegrass requires 4 hours of sunlight. Fine fescues require 3 or more.

    I think this customer needs to breakdown and realize a ground cover or landscaping is in order. No miracle grass here.
  8. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643

    Yes, idiots who advocate soil tests are just that, idiots. Knowing the make up of your soil has nothing to do with identifying nutrient deficincies and what soil amendments might be needed. Please, just seed the lawn because it's obvious the customer has an older lawn from your original post. Crazy hippies and their soil tests. I've been in this business 30 years and I do the same thing every year. Just lime it...
  9. GrazerZ

    GrazerZ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 670

    I now see the light!! So all that money every year we spend on soil tests is just a waste...what a fool I've been. I'll I'll just guess at what it needs from now on and have wonderful lawns everywhere.
    GIVE ME A STINKN BREAK!!!!:dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy:
  10. dcondon

    dcondon LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,246

    Well answer the questions the other guys asked and maybe we can help. Do you have any pics????

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