Dealer starting to get on my nerves

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by farmboy1285, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. farmboy1285

    farmboy1285 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 574

    I just had my mower in the shop for its 100 hour service and got it back the other day. So I pull the mower out of my garage today to get my walkbehind out so I can change the oil in it, and I notice that a couple of stickers are missing. This isn't a huge deal but I try to get my mowers in good shape. But the thing is this is the second time this dealer has washed the lettering off the mower. The first time they blasted the lettering on the belt cover off and I took the cover in and they replaced it. So then a little later I was checking the oil and saw there was at least a 1/2 a quart of extra oil in the motor. I am no expert but over time cant to much oil ruin an engine. So now I am really pissed I am walking back into the house to get my keys and take the mower over to straighten things out, and I realize that my trailer is in storage at my farm about an hour away and my dads truck is with the trailer. So I have no way of getting the mower to the shop. After realizing that I cant do anything right now I just put the mower away and go inside. Then I really started getting mad cause I remembered how the guys made me wait at their shop for about 45 min while the finish the mower, even though when I called to see if the mower was done they said I had been done for a week. Any way I guess I just need to vent but it seems like every time I go there they screw something up and charge me an arm and leg. Has any body had anything like this happen to them? Should I just start taking my mower to another shop of should I just let the dealer fix the mower and let stuff like this keep happening Sorry to write a book here but just wanted to let you guys know the story.
  2. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I know what you mean, here are some things I learned:

    Probably I am a perfectionist when it comes to repairs, it's not just with mowers but the cars and the truck it's the same story, every time I take it in to have something done I feel like they just don't care as much as they should. Stupid things, a bolt didn't get tightened, the fluid level is off or they used the wrong stuff (I'm serious, like ATF in a manual) just oversights that to me, my attitude is why am I paying so much for this?

    But I did learn over the years to accept this, that's just how it is.
    Now if I want it done right, I do it myself.
    It's not always better, I make mistakes, too...
    But what helps is today I don't take it in out of convenience, but more because of necessity, and that helps considerably when it's not just because I didn't feel like it. Everything else just DIY, heck with it, less frustration that way.

    As for the oil...
    Two things: Some engines you check the oil with the dipstick seated but NOT turned! In other words it's still loose, more than a few engines are made like this, you'll want to check your manual as to the proper procedure because it makes a difference of about 1/2 a quart readings either way (which, if you've been checking it wrong could also mean you've been running it low thinking it was right, for example).

    But anyhow, the other thing: I recently took a 10hp Briggs apart, and at least from the look of things there is no oil pump in these smaller engines. It appears the oil just sits in the bottom of the housing and the parts moving drives it throughout the machine.
    Now I will admit that way too much oil is likely not good, but I also believe the housing would likely hold close to a gallon of oil, so 1/2 a quart or so over the standard 1/2 gallon capacity really doesn't appear that it would be detrimental.
    I wouldn't be for testing it, certainly I believe some air is required inside the housing but I would think a little too much oil just isn't that big of a deal, unlike car engines I don't THINK you can blow a seal and if you do it's a minor repair in comparison (might still run a couple hundred lol), but there's no oil pressure due to too much, not without a pump, or at least not in the same critical fashion.

    Hope that helps.
  3. juspayme

    juspayme LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 299

    doesnt suprise me farmboy. most dealers are BUNK.
  4. Frue

    Frue LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,472

    Farmboy there is a thread I started about let me help you dealers out. Go over and read what dealers had to say about us.
  5. GravelyNut

    GravelyNut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,594

    Here's another example of oil levels vs safe limits. On the dipstick of my 2001 there are several different marks going from low at the 4 qt level to full at the 7qt level. Anything in between is ok. And that is a height difference of almost 1 inch of oil in the pan at the time it is checked. If filled to the top mark, when due for a change, it will be near the bottom one.
  6. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    This is a perfect opportunity for you to begin to learn to how to do some of your repairs/maintenance yourself. not only will it save you money, but it will also save you the time of running around picking up trailers, and mowers, and waiting. Its winter, things are slow. sign up at a vo-tech for small engine repair, ect.....
  7. johnnywill08

    johnnywill08 LawnSite Senior Member
    from MA z6
    Posts: 372

    i guess i'm lucky, my service guys rule.... nice guys, do little things for nothing, care about the work and explain things to me like i'm not an idiot...
  8. IN2MOWN

    IN2MOWN LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,993

    Who's your dealer farmboy?
  9. I feel for some of you guys, I can't imagine taking my equipment to a dealer for a oil change, sharpen blades or a 100 hour check up. I haven't taken a piece of equipment to a dealer in years, even when its new, if it breaks under warranty we will repair whatever and take the part to the dealer and get the new piece, never have had problems like that. Even a couple of my guys are good at fixin whatever. We keep a good supply of spare parts and have backup equipment. I have seen both side of the fence and it isn't all roses for a dealer. The winter is a good time to learn about your equipment and learn to do repairs instead of on the computer bitching about it, turn it into a positive and learn something.
  10. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    I love when dealers tout dealer support. Yes its important to a point. But for me at least its not as big an issue as they try to make it out to be.

    I do the majority of the work myself.

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