Deep root fertilizing, whats in your mix?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Az Gardener, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Besides the NPK components what are you adding to deep root fertilizing mixes? Auxin's? Gibberillens? Michorizae? I know what I want to use for the base but I am looking for that something extra. Any recommendations from the brain trust.
     
  2. PHS

    PHS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 724

    Other than micronutrients I don't usually add other stuff to it anymore unless requested. I used to add Mycorhizae to all the mixes then I found out the product I was using had a high % of dead spores anyway but I was still getting very good results so I dropped it all together and never noticed the difference. I think if the soil conditions are conducive to their growth they will be living their anyway. Spiking the mix will have a very short lived benefit if the conditions aren't conducive for growth to begin with.

    In your high pH soils are you adding sulfur to the mixes?
     
  3. garydale

    garydale LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 813

    We have been using "Merit" in our mix with reasonable results. (aphids,lacebugs etc.)
     
  4. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    I will be using a organic product that buffers the salts very well. I used the products on one property through a fertilizer injector and did a soil check just because the lawn looked so good. I wanted to see what was going on down below. The PH was 7.2 which is unheard of here, 8-8.2 is more the norm. I will have to ask the mad scientist that mixes the organic product what effect the merit would have. Thanks for the tips, keep em coming.
     
  5. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,604

    First, let's stop calling it Deep Root Fertilization. 90% of the feeder roots are within the top 6-9" of soil. If you go deeper than that you are past the root uptake zone & most of your inputs are wasted.

    After 25 years of injecting liquid salt based NPK ferts, I made the change to organic based materials such as kelp, humates, fish hydrolysates and other natural additives and am getting much better results. Healthier plants that look great!

    I save the mycorhizea for transplants and disturbed soils.
     
  6. humble1

    humble1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from MA
    Posts: 2,499

    The spores have to germinate to grow, they will only do that when exposed to the root extuates(sp?). How did you come to that conclusion? Not attacking you just trying to understand as I use them when D.R feeding.
     
  7. humble1

    humble1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from MA
    Posts: 2,499

    why not use the fungi when it helps disolves minerals, forms microagregates, increase root mass etc. not my opinion but published studyies
     
  8. PHS

    PHS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 724

    The conclusion was based a number of studies I read comparing different mycorhizae products at the time. I don't recall the name of the one I was using, it came in an orange and black package and was consistently coming in with low viability percentages. I switched to MycoApply which had much higher viability percentages. I still use it on stagnating or declining mature trees or when there are root disease problems/ root damage to try and help out but not on younger trees.

    AZ, If your soils are around 8 pH, as far as I know mycorhizae don't grow well in that range. Might check into that more before adding them.

    Do you know what the salt index is of your fertilizers? Just curious how it compares to other products.
     

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