Deer / Tick Prevention

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by hurrikanelandscaping, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. MarkSupply

    MarkSupply LawnSite Member
    Posts: 39

  2. humble1

    humble1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from MA
    Posts: 2,499

    I don't see how that's possible, there is plenty of food for deer during the summer, its the deep snow and lack of natural predators that drive them towards natural landscapes. The amount of acres of woods depends on where u live, and the food available. Additionally people put out bird feeders and don't allow hunting because deer are cute, cute but they taste good.
    I wonder why you would say don't spray the lawns, there are ticks on the lawns. They drop off of animals all the time, if you have little critters going across your lawn then you most certainly will have them in the lawn. There will be higher numbers in beds and wood edges but we still spray the lawns.
    QUOTE=phasthound;4401358]With deer populations as high as they are around here they will get used to most spray products because hunger overrules deterrents. They have stripped forests of the under story plants except for barberry. With no saplings surviving, these forests will not last for more than 50 years.

    There is a company that specializes in deer deterrent, can't think of there name at the moment. Fencing is the only long term solution I know of.

    If you're trying to reduce ticks, don't bother spraying lawns because tick habitat is shady, brush and tall grasses.[/QUOTE]
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  3. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    I think the automatic sprinkler to chase off deer, dogs, etc. is a unique tool, however, I can't help but chuckle at the irony. Since this offers a way to chase off deer, dogs,etc. in essence the water will attract birds that are after a bath or for worms that come up. Then you will have a problem of bird excrement, and the cats that are attracted to the foul.
  4. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,583

  5. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,230

  6. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    A deer will avoid one spot and travel to another on the property if there is a food source. You would have to place these deer poles about 50 ft. apart around the perimeter to do any good. And then once the perimeter is avoided, then the deer will just do their destruction on the inside. To me, these gimmicks are okay for some situations but isn't really practical for all.
  7. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,956


    Once again a QUESTION not advice about repelling deer. What about Electric fence?? For both Horses and cattle I use a hot top wire on my fence. Fence chargers come rated by miles of wire they can keep charged. They can give a good jolt. They can be set up on a timer to only turn on during certain times of the Day or Night.

  8. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    Bifenethrin..........Deltamethrin! These are good choices for exterior tick control. Remember, the ticks will be in places other than on the grass.........they will be in the trees-sometimes higher than a homeowner sprayer can reach, they will be in shrubbery, scrub grass areas and wildflowers. Be careful in treating these wildflower areas during bloom for bee populations will be lessened. I would follow the directions on the labels and treat on monthly intervals during high deer travel times.

    Putting up a fence is okay, but remember this-- Buck, Doe, Fawns can jump a normal 5ft. tall fence with ease. You will want to have razor wire boundaries installed to be efficient and don't be fooled with the idea of electric fencing. The deer can sense electrical impulses so don't go there.
    I was being foolish about my comment of the bird and cat population increase but there is some practical knowledge to that radical blurt out.
    If you are seriously wanting to clear out the deer. Contact a real-professional trapper and have them place out scent barrier of natural predator's. This will work during rut season. Then again, just contain some of your own urine in a gallon milk jug and pour it here and there on the outskirts of the property. This will help............but hey, people are civilized and don't do such things...........RIGHT? Get back to the basics of why you don't pee around the hunting camp or while you are in the woods attracting deer. Think about it!! Deer smell humans or their scent and they are gone.

    One more small thing. Many cans tied to heavy string set along the path of travel where the wind can blow them around..........this will deter deer from coming, yet they will find an alternate route.

    Why not set out noise makers, set out scent traps, purchase one of the product I mentioned above to spray around the house? To be completely effective with controlling the will need ovacide products added to the sprays, but then this get too cost sensitive if you have a large property. Talk to a professional, then talk to a Game and Fish Agent, The County Extension services and get more input on this subject.
  9. humble1

    humble1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from MA
    Posts: 2,499

  10. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    You make a good point on deer being not the only culprit in tick spread. In my area, the deer are only in the county areas or better set 100 miles around our rice country. We have to travel to deer hunt. Lyme's disease must be a problem in your area as per the population of urban and city life meets. We are privy to squirrel, raccoon, mice,rat and other small rodents that pose a small issue, but tick populations arise from outside aerial applications of pesticides to crops. Then we do have areas of unpopulated rangeland. Ticks do mitigate looking for food....BLOOD! when the temperatures start to rise.
    In essence, Arkansas requires a license for nuisance pest control such as mosquito's but the structural pest control section will cover outside and inside pests. My license covers outside pests of the lawn and landscape. Then again, if a tick,flea or other such structural pest enters the lawn area, it is covered under general lawn spraying of insecticides.
    I again will treat a lawn to target pests in such areas of high traffic where the tick and flea will persist. I really wish the public was more conscious about pest issues then my business would benefit from the control.

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