Deere backpack blower fouling plugs and leak gas from carb??

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Pecker, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    What would cause this?

    History: About 4 years old, used one day a week on about a dozen lawns. Has always started on the first pull and ran great. Never needed anything but a clean air filter every few hours and a new spark plug about twice a year (I always knew it was time when it required an extra pull to start) and a new fuel tank with lines last summer.

    About two weeks ago, it had been running perfect all day. Get to last job of the day and it won't start. I finished up the job with the Billygoat vac. Put in a new plug in the blower and it started right up but smoked and smoked. Eventually all the fuel burnt off. I figured the smoke was from fuel sitting in the muffler from trying to start it earlier. Ran great for a full day of cutting.

    Then today, a week later, I notice gas leaking from somewhere on the carburator. It won't start again and the plug is black and dripping wet when I pulled it.

    What could be causing this? And what do I need to do? Thanks a million in advance!
     
  2. Lawn Masters

    Lawn Masters LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 850

    possibly the inlet lever in the carb is stuck open, which would cause fuel to leak into the engine, and cause the problem you describe. if you do anything first, try dismantling the carb, cleaning it out, and putting new gaskets in it.
     
  3. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Got a carb rebuilt on order. Will be here on Monday. Any advice on rebuilding the carb? Thanks.
     
  4. Lawn Masters

    Lawn Masters LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 850

    besides note where and how everything you remove came out, and installing the new parts in that EXACT order, not much to say. also, there will probably be a set of gaskets, for one side that you have to get teh right one from a few different ones or it wont run at all.
     
  5. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,022

    Also while your into it there is a fuel inlet screen, These will varnish over but still look clean. Spray carb. choke cleaner through this screen to make sure it isn't restricted.
     
  6. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Ok. Thank ya'll. I'll be sure to update you when as I make progress, starting after Monday. Thanks.
     
  7. Jim Buessing

    Jim Buessing LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    You should dismantel the carb, remebering which gaskets went where, the kit will contain parts for other carb variations, remove the needle and lever also the the fuel screen. Clean the orafices with compressed air, I have use spary lube through a platic tip to get in some tight spots also. DO NOT USE CARB CLEANER! The carbs do not react well to carb cleaner manufacturers advise to not use. Reassemble the needle lever and fuel screen. The lever height may need adjustment, if it is set too high the needle will stay open and fuel will continue to flow right through. Reassemble gaskets in proper order and install on carb. Initial jet settings on most carbs are 1 1/4 on the high an low.
    Good Luck. If you have any problems consult your local outdoor power equipment dealer.
     
  8. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,022

    Well, Kohler states to use carb. cleaner on their Nikki carbs. , Kawasaki states to use carb. cleaner on their Nikki carbs., Briggs states to use carb. cleaner on their Walbro and Nikki carbs. and Tanaka States to use carb. cleaner on their Walbro carbs., I couldn't get the Zama pdf to down load but I'd be willing to bet they state the use also.
    So which Manufactures advise not to use it ?
     
  9. Jim Buessing

    Jim Buessing LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Echo, Stihl and Shindaiwa have stated in their service schools, which I have been attending for quiet some time, not to use carb cleaners. The carbs that are used for these manufacturers are Walbro, Zama and TK. Now the issues that came from using carb cleaner were in the cast ones. Most of those have since resolved with the development and use of the plastic bodied carbs. The advisment is to still avoid the use of carb cleaner..and it is usually an unnecessary tool. You do not see varnish build up as the problem for most of these issues. At least varnish build up to the point of needing carb cleaners to clear is out. The majority of problems is debris and worn diaphrams. If you have a 2-cycle carb that is severly varnished and requires carb cleaner, spray wont help it would have to be dipped for a while, then you still may not get all of the varnish out of the tiny passages. It is at that time you are best off replacing the entire unit to save you a lot of heacache in the long run.
     
  10. Jim Buessing

    Jim Buessing LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Also I am not trying to get into a mechanic war. The difference in this situation is 2-cycle vs 4-cycle. Yes we have and continue to use carb cleaner in 4-cycle carbs. The corrosion issues were only in the 2-cycle units.
     

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