Design Pricing Question

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Blmtlandscapes, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. Blmtlandscapes

    Blmtlandscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 116

    I'm fairly new with design work and have a question about pricing. How do you work out the pricing structure in terms of going back and changing a couple things on your initial drawing. Do you offer to make a couple of changes for free or do you charge extra? Thanks
  2. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,742

    I write a contract that covers one major revision (will change anything or everything), but will also make a couple of minor chages after that (not in my contract, but will do out of good will). A flat cost is easier to sell than an hourly rate. Just don't get roped int endless revisions.

    The important thing, in my opinion, is to have a good contract that clearly tells what you will do AND clearly tells what extras cost. That not only covers you to get paid for extras, but it makes your client more forthcoming with information so that you can "git 'er done" without a lot of revisions.
  3. mcw615

    mcw615 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 473

    AGLA would you mind sharing your contract?
  4. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,742

    I spent too much time researching, writing, and rewriting to come up with a custom contract to have it spread around, but I have explained it in a lot of detail without exact wording and specifics several times (I think I did this very recently on this forum).

    The forth post on the following thread:
  5. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    Generally my contracts for design allows for one major change, or two minor changes--minor changes cover changes to one section of the overall plan. Little things I'll do for free.

    In terms of pricing the cost is based on how large the area is, and is a flat fee.
  6. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Design pricing should be based on the amount of time the design process will take, including the plan, notes, research, site visits, client meetings and some revisions. Any more work than that and someone needs to pay for your time. You may need to base the time on size of the project, complexity, features and even client involvement. Some clients will be hands off, some will want to steer the design & installation and others than will make you wonder why they hired a designer. You can estimate design fees similarly as you would any other landscape service; labor(time), materials, overhead and profit.


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