Did I kill these?

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by Moose's Mowing, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    Did a big clean out job for a customer this week. There were several HUGE mophead hydrangeas that were terribly overgrown. Most of the plant was laying on the ground. Looks like they've never been pruned before. She wanted them pulled out so we could remove the old mulch, edge and install stone. I suggested to cut them way back rather than yanking them out and told her this might kill them (but we were going to kill them anyway). So we cut them way down, pretty much left 1-2' of the woody stem on them. No flowers or leaves left. I pretty much had to cut them down far enough to where it was just like cutting an ornamental grass down in the fall. Any less cutting and we couldn't get the mulch out and put new stone in. These things were a real mess. I read that if you prune these in the fall, they might not bloom the following summer. That isn't much of a concern in this case. I'm just wondering if they'll survive and grow back or if they're shot. This is in the NE and they were red flowers if that matters.
     
  2. RussellB

    RussellB LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,023

    I cut mine down every year and they grow back and bloom. Everybody should because they are just plain ugly in the winter.
     
  3. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,262

    You didn't kill those hydrangea's. You'll have to paint FRESHLY cut stem's with straight round up concentrate if you don't want them coming back.
     
  4. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    sweeeeeeet. I don't do much "landscaping" mainly mowing and grunt work. Don't know much about plants really. Now I get to look like a supastar woot woot!!! Wish I would have had time to research this properly before doing it but that wasn't much of an option here.

    Thanks for the replies guys.
     
  5. DodgeDude

    DodgeDude LawnSite Member
    Posts: 12

    Yep, it's not on you.
     
  6. M&L

    M&L LawnSite Member
    Posts: 245


    If your unsure on how to care for the things your being paid to tend to, I'd strongly advise some type of plant Identification book or phone app that deals with your area. Having info like that readily available could save you money and your reputation while freeing your mind from the constant worry and second guessing....
    If you make it a point to learn the names, fert requirements, water needs and pruning recommendations for the most common local landscape plants, not only will your yards look better, but you'll sound much more educated to your clients and be able to step in to higher end properties. Just learn one a day, or a flower, a shrub and a tree every week.
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  7. Tyler259

    Tyler259 Banned
    Posts: 100

    Any recommendations for a New England book?
     
  8. M&L

    M&L LawnSite Member
    Posts: 245

    I'd need a book to tell me where New England is Haha. J/K

    Its hard to say, because I'm on the other coast. I'd start with Local nurseries, and fertilizer/chem suppliers. I'd bet if they didn't have it, they could steer you in the right direction.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. Tyler259

    Tyler259 Banned
    Posts: 100

    Thanks, I've been searching on Amazon so far.
     
  10. RussellB

    RussellB LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,023

    Nurseries and local book stores will have what your looking for. If you don't see it, ask for it. They will get it for you.
     

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