DIY Compost Tea Brewer

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Tim Wilson, Aug 21, 2008.

  1. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    I've posted a little paper with some basic guidelines for ya'll wanting to build your own CT brewers. I hope the moderator lets me away with posting the link here this once. If it is removed, I'll understand.

    http://www.microbeorganics.com/#So_You_Wanna_Build_A_Compost_Tea_Brewer

    Have fun!

    Salutations,
    Tim

    BTW. No problem with the post removed the other day. I fully expected it.
     
  2. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    well done Tim, that was excellent!!

    If I may be so bold, are there any ideas on a membrane type diffuser? also may I also suggest that as a general rule, 2x the out let size for the tube?? any restriction at all is a real loss. and one more, any one ever try laser holes, in the PVC? we did once it failed bad.

    thanks again for your input!!:clapping::clapping:
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

  4. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    more or less, just larger, feet not inches............
     
  5. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Hi TG,

    I'm a dolt I guess. I don't know what you mean by 'membrane type diffuser'. Do you mean flexible, pliable?

    If using diaphragm air pumps, which is all I was addressing, as long as your tubing/pipe is no smaller than the outlet there is no marked restriction of CFM (at least with my flow meter). I have not tested this with regenerative blowers. But thank you for pointing this out. I should make the point that piping/tubing should be at least the size of the pump outlet. 1/2 inch thin walled PVC is actually 5/8 of an inch so I guess I'm covered within the bounds of what I said.

    Thank you for your nice comments.
    Tim
     
  6. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    the ones I am speaking of, are neoprene, like th ones Kiril posted a link for, we have a custom one with a larger surface area than normal almost 9 sq feet, the idea being that as the air pressure increases the holes open more like a tire tube with a hole. the back flow or pressure loss with a regenerative blower is even more of a pit fall, 3" pvc will barely handle a re gen blower. At least the size of the opening is a minimum, its like a water pump, small inlet and out let to a giant pipe to distribute? we have air trouble all the time with the heat and all so we go to some extreme measures to keep 500+ gallons at a time cool.:waving:
     
  7. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    also just want to applaud you on the surface tension that you touched on :clapping::clapping:
     
  8. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Hi Treegal,

    Okay, now I get it. I would think these would be a pain to clean. I use a Gast 95 CFM regenerative blower with a 1.5 inch air line. I use multiple Sweetwater 12 inch glass bonded diffusers with no problem but I built my 1200 gallon brewer shallow (28") (above ground swimming pool liner and wooden frame) so there is less back pressure. Also there is greater atmospheric interface for enhanced gas exchange.

    Tim
     
  9. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    no we just turn off the air for a sec and dump some pool chlorine into a cap on top of the anti siphon loop. the wash gets used to clean the spray tanks and then gets used again to was containers and then the floors, after that it gets sewer-ed. and they really don't get to dirty inside as long as the air stays on. If the power goes out the hole's sort of close over and leak little water, we still have an anti siphon loop.

    most of the brewers we have made have a large head of water 56" or greater some have almost 120" of water after the diffuser back pressure. mostly with cone tanks.
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Larger = higher cost. Use as many of these that you need to get your larger unit.
     

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