Does a 'strip' drain work well behind retaing walls?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by mcclureandson, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    As opposed to drainage tile, clean gravel backfill, soil seperator etc...Has anyone used these enough to comment? I'm curious because it seems like a faster install in some cases, but the manufacturer's products I've looked at call for specific sand around the drain...should it be compacted to some degree...and what about the rest of the backfill, how about that? Thanks.
     
  2. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

    I would not recommend the strip drains for behind retaining walls for the following reasons
    A) They are mainly used for surface water in relatively flat areas so i don't think they could handle any reasonable water flow

    B) Will do nothing for penetrating ground water

    C) In all cases draintile exits to daylight at the bottom of the wall. Where do you Daylight a strip drain?

    IMHO I would stick to the proper way of doing it. 1,000,000 engineers can't be wrong.

    Chris
     
  3. B&B Lndscpng & Lwn Srvc

    B&B Lndscpng & Lwn Srvc LawnSite Member
    Posts: 112

    I agree with cgland. I also have a prime example. My brother did not listen to me and built 12 high concrete block retaining wall. He even added rebar and filled holes with concrete. I told him not to do all that just add gravel and drainage but NOOOOO!! his way would last longer. 5 years it lasted and then one night after about 2 weeks of steady rain 45' of 12' high wall fell on the ground. Today he has a wall built out of railroad cross ties for the rustic look with nothing but proper drainage behind it that i installed which has stood for 10 years now.
     
  4. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    I think we're talking about two different types of 'strip' drains...I'm not talking about a channel drain for flat surfaces but a 'strip' drain that's part of a prefabricated drainage system. Soil seperator fabric on one (or both sides), waffle-like interior, couple of inches wide and anywhere from 6" to 12" tall...some are rated to move more water than 4" or even 6" pipe. They are used on athletic fields, golf courses etc...and the various manufacturers recommend them for replacement of tradtional methods in french drains and drainage behind walls. I AM NOT ADVOCATING THESE PRODUCTS...I just want to know if anyone has used them before.
     
  5. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    I got some samples from one company for a job that hasn't happened yet,so I can't give real good analysis.
    That said,It will cut down on time and materials to be used.I tried it out with the "NickN test" which was to run water over it with the faucet and it works just like they claim.The soil seperating fabric is thick enough to keep debris out,but also lets water seap through.I like the fact that it can be adapted to regular pvc also.
    I have a price list and the cost is better than buying corrugated,soil seperator,gravel,and socks.Also,no backhoe is needed,just a trencher.All you do is trench the area,lay in the pipe(which is a stack of small pipes joined together),and fill with sand to aid drainage.
     
  6. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    Thanks...that's what I'm talking about. I'm thinking of using it as a subsurface "french style" drain at some new construction, and perhaps as drainage behind a couple of hundred feet of a short (-3ft tall) wall. Let me know how it works out if you use it first...thanks again. Also, where'd you get your price list? And what company did you get samples from?
     
  7. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    Varicore.You can access their site here:www.varicore.com
    Just call or email them and have them fax the price list.
    I've got a drainage job to do this spring that would be perfect for this.Just waiting on the customer to get the money for the install.
     
  8. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    Thanks again, I just spoke with them and the info is on the way. What I'm most optimistic about is how much quicker these products can collect water...I don't care if the flow rate of a 6" is slightly less than 4" pipe...as another recent thread discusses, how often have you seen even a 4" pipe flowing at capacity? I've never seen more than a trickle. Anyway, maybe it will be more cost effective...
     
  9. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

    I know exactly what drain you speak of, but again, how do you daylight it? What about subsurface water? :dizzy:

    Chris
     
  10. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    CG,
    At the end of your run,you just adapt it to PVC and exit to daylight.
     

Share This Page