Does anyone do "dormant seeding"

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Pilgrims' Pride, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. Pilgrims' Pride

    Pilgrims' Pride LawnSite Senior Member
    from MA.
    Posts: 481

    What experiences have you had with dormant seeding?
    I've read that it is done often on athletice fields.
    What kind of results should I expect?
    Any thoughts?
     
  2. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    waste of time
     
  3. TURFLORD

    TURFLORD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 834

    Erosion,snow mold,animal foraging. Just wait for Springtime.
     
  4. TforTexas

    TforTexas LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 260

    People do alot of winter overseeding here in Austin. As the Bermuda goes dormant they scalp it down and overseed perrenial rye to stay green and growing over the winter months. The customers appreciate the green turf year round and the LCO's love extending thier mowing season year round.
    Don't ask me why but this is Huge here in Austin and nowhere else I've heard of, other than athletic fields Come spring the hot weather burns out the rye and the bermuda zoysia or St Augustine kick back in. Some spray the rye out with revolver. I will sell 250,000 dollars worth of periennial rye this quarter and no other stores around here, Houston Dallas or San Antonio will sell even 1/4 that much.
     
  5. BSDeality

    BSDeality LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,850

    riiiight. 'just cause i don't like relish on my hot dogs doesn't mean its bad.

    Dormant seeding is mother natures slit-seeding. one downside is that you can't apply herbicides right away in the spring, but then again you can't do it with regular seeding either.
     
  6. SodKing

    SodKing LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,648

    I agree, its done all the time. My 99 year old granmother used to tell me she would go spread the seed on top of the snow. That way when it melted, it would work its way into the soil.

    In MA you should be able to seed into the first week of Novemmber and still obtain a minor amount of germination and growth. The rest willl germinate in the spring.
     
  7. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    We do it all the time and have great success. We are getting ready to install about an acre's worth of grass here in just a few weeks. We can't do it right now, because we might get some germination and we definitely don't want that at this time. The benefit of dormant seeding is that it can be done when everything is still dry and is easier to work with. This way, when the ground thaws, reach the right temperatures, and everything is still real wet, the seed is already down mixed in, and ready to go. We are then ready for a good spring growth, Even though the optimum time is in early fall, sometimes as other projects are completed or need to be completed, this timing doesn't always work out. That is why the seed has to go down when it can. So often, in the spring, things are just too wet to get on or to work with.
    As far as someone saying it is a waste of time,..I have NO idea where that philosophy is coming from.
     
  8. BSDeality

    BSDeality LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,850

    I have an idea... its called lack of professional education. "waste of time" is what all the other guys around him call it, so thats what he believes.
     
  9. LonniesLawns

    LonniesLawns LawnSite Senior Member
    from KS
    Posts: 317

    Dormant seeding is the SECOND best time to seed. It about 30 steps under Early fall -- but still 30 steps above spring.

    Look around at some studies done at Purdue. A lawn dormant seeded at Thankgiving does MUCH better than alawn seeded in Early march.

    I up my seed by about 20% to account for loss due to environmental factors.
     
  10. Natural Impressions

    Natural Impressions LawnSite Member
    Posts: 171

    I will be dormant seeding this year. Should i remove the thatch before or just wait for the spring?
     

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