1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

Does anyone have there own small nursery?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by ryde307, May 27, 2009.

  1. ryde307

    ryde307 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 540

    I have been in the lawn and landscape business for 6 or so years we are by no means a large company but big enough size. We have moved alot more into the landscape side of things and have some space available. I was thinking about keeping a small amount of plant stock around for small jobs and to let size over time. Just curious if anyone has some experiance with this. Some do's and don'ts of it or any info would be great. Thanks
     
  2. CALandscapes

    CALandscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 946

    We started doing this about a year ago. We utilize our nursery to hold plants that we get on special or from out of state (when trying to fill an 18-wheeler and make the best out of the freight cost).

    Here are a few tips:

    Be sure that it's irrigated. If it's not, you'll either have plant material unusable for projects or will have high labor costs hand-watering.

    Build a shade house. You can do this simply with 4x4 posts and 2x4 runners and supports. Here's a good site for shade cloths:
    http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/

    Stay on top of your plants; check them regularly for diseases, trimming needs, etc.

    Don't place your plants too closely together - take a look at the way that some of the nurseries you deal with lay out their stock; there's generally always enough room between plants to allow for growth as well as to ensure that each plant is getting adequate water.

    Keep a record of what you have so that you're not ordering plants that you're already holding. I know it sounds matter-of-fact, but this is a problem that we often have, as we have several different people doing the ordering.

    Keep a stock of different sized containers as well as potting soil, fertilizer, pesticides and fungicides.

    Send me a PM if there's anything else I can help you with. Best of luck!

    -Chase
     
  3. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    I think Chase covered it quite well. These are the same guidelines I follow. I do like to pot things up into larger sizes of containers, as buying small can be profitable, and they grow. Drip or mini spray heads are a great way to water properly and economically, so be prepared for that. Overhead watering works, but is very inefficient and brings with it a whole set of problems. A good quality fabric for the area is essential for maintenance. Most suppliers will have access to a groundcover fabric used for nurseries, it's woven with lines spaced a foot apart. This fabric is extremely durable, UV protected and will virtuall eliminate any weed growth from underneath. It will sheet the water off, so realize that when positioning. The downhill side will get very wet. I may try to collect it in a channel drain, but what to do with it then.

    Kirk
     

Share This Page