Don't believe the Diesel Hype

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by Rons Rightway Lawncare, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. Rons Rightway Lawncare

    Rons Rightway Lawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,163

    I own and operate a 2008 Toyota Tundra double cab, 5.7 liter I force V-8 engine, 6 speed transmission.

    Good friend of mine owns and operates a 2003 Dodge Ram quad cab, 5.9 liter Cummin diesel, automatic transmission.

    Both of us tow 7x16 foot enclosed trailers. Both of us tow in the same area on the same roads. Both of us run the airconditioners while towing and both of us try not to take off from stops like it is a drag race but we do like to keep up with traffic.

    I am averaging ( all towing the enclosed trailer ) 10.5-11.5 MPG

    He is averaging 8.5-10.5 MPG under the same conditions.

    Unloaded and just driving the truck around we get about the same city and highway mpg.




    Another friend of mine has a 2005 Chevy four door, loaded and with the Duramax/ allision combo. He doesn't tow with it, just drives it around as a daily driver. He averages around 15 mpg. My truck under the same type of driving he is doing would match or exceed his mpg. On cheaper fuel too no less.


    You may know people that brag about the great mpg their diesels get, but bottom line is to get this great mpg you have to drive 50 mph in the slow lane and leave traffic lights no faster than a kid on a 10 speed would. Not realistic real world driving.

    I believe the tread has reversed in recent years... Used to be in the late 1980's and 1990's, diesels did get much better milage over gas trucks. Now I believe the tread has reversed, and the diesels are far worse than they used to be and the gassers are better than ever before now.

    As always, I am sure there will be someone who will post and say that no way will a gas truck get better mpg pulling some ridiculously heavy load... True, I agree. Over 8-10 thousand pounds of weight I would say a diesel starts to hold a advantage over gas, but under that amount I believe you can do better on gasoline and save all kinds of money in the process.
     
  2. heather lawn sp

    heather lawn sp LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    Only one question. . .

    How long have you run diesel pick-up trucks?
     
  3. Rons Rightway Lawncare

    Rons Rightway Lawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,163

    3 years. A 1999 Dodge ram 2wd with Cummins diesel and 5 speed stick, and a 2000 Dodge ram 4wd with cummins diesel and a automatic. Bought both brand new.
     
  4. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,518

    Ron,

    I have noticed that if I keep it under 65 MPH on county roads I can get all the way up to 20-23 MPG if you baby it. No load obviously.

    I have around 13,000 miles on mine now and it seems to be slightly better on gas and noticeably more power.

    Have you had any trouble with your truck yet?
     
  5. heather lawn sp

    heather lawn sp LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    Did you find those old diesels better thean the new ones (or did you bother to keep the mileage from back then)?
     
  6. TXNSLighting

    TXNSLighting LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 6,462

    that 03 cummins should get much better than that. my dmax pulling my 16 ft cargo with about 4k in it gets 13-14 at 70 mph. 03 was a bad year for the cummins i think. My 05 never got any less than 11 towing my enclosed. ( going as fast as i wanted) 80+
     
  7. Lynden-Jeff

    Lynden-Jeff LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    Im going to call B.S. My chipped 6.0 F250 will get 15 MPG easily pulling our 20 ft enclosed. Not to mention with the 500+ HP it is fun to drive around unloaded and will get around 18-20 without pulling. I love how people come on here and think they know everything!
     
  8. bobcat_ron

    bobcat_ron LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,119

    A Dodge is still heavier than a Toyota, that's the difference, engine RPM's at highway speeds are a factor. Dodge's are just plain heavy trucks.
     
  9. WH401

    WH401 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 572

    "He is averaging 8.5-10.5 MPG under the same conditions."
    I highly doubt he's getting that low of an MPG. 03 was probably the highest mpg year for the common rail engines as they were only starting out at the high 200 - low 300 hp range and didn't have the 3rd injection event. I can tow a 30 ft. house trailer through the mountains of New England with an 02 Dodge 2500 and still get about 12 - 13 mpg, and that's not going the speed limit either.

    "I believe the tread has reversed in recent years... Used to be in the late 1980's and 1990's, diesels did get much better milage over gas trucks. Now I believe the tread has reversed, and the diesels are far worse than they used to be and the gassers are better than ever before now."
    I agree with you that 10+ years ago, diesel got much better mpg then there gas counter parts. Yes they don't do as good today because of the emissions equipment but they still do better then there gas counter parts. I traded an 04 Dodge 1500 that would get no better than 13 mpg no matter how you drove it for a 06 3500 DRW w/4.10's that I get 16 in regularly.

    You may know people that brag about the great mpg their diesels get, but bottom line is to get this great mpg you have to drive 50 mph in the slow lane and leave traffic lights no faster than a kid on a 10 speed would. Not realistic real world driving.
    We all get different mpg figures just based on how we drive, but 16 mpg in my 3500 is going 10 - 15 over the speed limit in any lane I please. My 92' 250 can easily get 20 mpg with the same kind of driving.
     
  10. jefftb

    jefftb LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 563

    Chalk another one here for thinking something is askew here with this one.

    My 2003 Ford F350 LWB 7.3L CC tows between 10,000-12,000 lbs. a lot and I get at least 12 MPG while doing so. I get slightly better than that with the 7x14 enclosed trailer at 5-6,000 lbs.

    Either the dodge is running in 3rd all the time or the math is deficient in the calculations.

    The old adage about diesel's is true....Unloaded they get at least the same as a really good gasser (or more). Loaded they get better mileage than a gasser. I have three trucks to prove it, all with different engines. The diesel wins every time in the fuel efficiency department overall.
     

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