Dormant Seeding: A Pictorial

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smallaxe, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Soil temperatures are the important ones... reportedly 50+ degrees F. for soil temperatures to get cool-season grasses to germinate... soil temps of 55+ for crabgrass...

    Here is where the sun beating down on the soil , or the soil being shaded by grass, makes a big difference as to,,, what germinates and when...
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,914

    We usually do not seed until the grass has greened up--perhaps about mid April in an average year. Air temps of about 50, as daily highs. Naturally, seedling emergence is slow, and below 32 at night happens often. I think I have seen new grass emerge in late April--but not sure--so I want to try it for myself.
    We still have snow in shaded areas.
     
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Wow, you guys are better off on that side of the Lake... we still have snow in sunny areas,,, over a foot of it in most places...
     
  4. Lawnut101

    Lawnut101 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,253

    True story. I'm hoping the slit seeding we did in September and October pops up this spring, after the extremely dry fall we had. I'm thinking most of the KBG 50% should have went dormant, or started growing roots right before it got cold. Good luck guys.
     
  5. frotis

    frotis LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 395

    I don't think my dormant seeding in CT will have time to germinate before its time to put down Pre-Em.
     
  6. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Same here... we got virtually no new grass last Fall once the irrigation went off and there was so much damage to take care of because of irrigation issues,,, so most of my eggs went into the dormant seeding basket with the first major snowstorm...
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,914

    I did some tests with Dimension crabgrass control granules. I treated new grass seedling in flower pots at only only 7 days old, when they were 2 inches tall. I used perennial rye at near ideal seeding conditions--moist soil and temps in the eighties. There was no death of the seedlings, but there was some slight stunting.
    Seedlings treated with Dimension at 23 days old and about 3 inches tall were not injured. Sept 2011.

    I think it may be possible to treat new grass with Dimension if you can get it up to 3 inches tall before treatment. I hope to try this this year. Clearly there is a narrow window of time when the new grass is 3 inches and yet crabgrass has not yet germinated. I think the label says the new grass must be well-established. You must accept some risk.

    If anybody tries this let us know what happens.
     
  8. frotis

    frotis LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 395

    I am worried about the dimension hurting the seeds before they have a chance to germinate.
     
  9. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    The idea here is that if the cool season grasses have a hard time germinating, then it is very likely that the CG is having an impossible time germinating...
    By the time the CG gets the correct temps etc.,,, the perennials should be well underway...
    If the sunny lawns are not growing Spring lawnseed and you're getting nervous, they may be the ones you pre-m, just to be safe...
    BUT,,, give the shadier lawns more time and at least give it a chance... :)

    What I do with spots that may come in with CG,,, I fill-in with AR after Memorial Weekend,,, I can safely give our soils up here at least that long to NOT produce CG...
     
  10. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,914

    Dimension will definately prevent germination of grass seed if Dimension is used before sowing the seed. Been there...done that.
    But if you can get your new grass up to about 3 inches tall before applying the Dimension crabgrass control...and crabgrass has not yet sprouted...Risky, but it should work out OK.
    I hope to try this on a bad lawn test site this year. Better test than using flower pots.
     

Share This Page