Dovetail trailer dragging solutions?

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by beransfixitinc, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. beransfixitinc

    beransfixitinc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 592

    Hi, recently we purchased a 12' trailer with a dovetail end, thinking this would make it easier for loading equipment. Well, anyway.. that's a different problem..

    Current problem is the back of the trailer only clears a smooth, level, surface by about 6"... if that much.

    We have heard a rumor that there is some type of solid steel wheel that can be mounted under the back of the trailer to keep the angle iron from dragging over high spots. We've already brought back a few nice size chunks of roadbase (and large rocks) from having to drive over roads that are being redone and need to find a way to increase the distance from the trailer to the pavement on the trailer.

    Are there maybe spacers that could be installed in the springs to raise the whole trailer?

    Any help, sooner the better, would be appreciated.
     
  2. green814

    green814 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 119

    When the trailer is hooked up to the truck & loaded, is the trailer level or is the tongue higher & the rear lower? If so, just buy a drop ball mount to level the trailer. Otherwise check w/ r/v suppliers. I have seen motorhome & long 5th wheels w/ wheels mounted underneath at the back to stop dragging.
    Chris
     
  3. beransfixitinc

    beransfixitinc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 592

    Well, I've got an almost 5 or 6 inch drop hitch on it now. The problem is these roads around here.. going from a main "road" to a side street has such a dip, that the trailer is scraping the road. I guess as long as the angle iron is strong enough to not break apart, we'll just keep leveling off the roads when we drive over them :cool2:
     
  4. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    just get the rollers.
     
  5. beransfixitinc

    beransfixitinc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 592


    Well, yeah, but what are they called, and where to get them?
     
  6. riches139

    riches139 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

  7. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    buddy i have no idea. first place i would go would be a trailer dealer
     
  8. wroughtn_harv

    wroughtn_harv LawnSite Member
    Posts: 194

    Take it down to your welding shop. They'll know how to fix it.

    The problem with the RV roller is they're made for heavy trailers that occasionally hit. And there's usually a little built in space to put the roller so that only the business end is exposed.

    With your dovetail there isn't that space to tuck up a good large metal caster.

    What they might have to make up is a two brackets that are very low profile with replacable steel wheels or even something like using pieces of half inch wall tubing over one inch pins. In effect rollers instead of wheels.

    If you decide it's really too complicated an issue to deal with consider this. Every brace and weld in your trailer is designed to work against a specific force. Every time you scrape and drag you're putting forces on those braces and welds they weren't designed to accomodate. Sorta like having a mower designed for lawns being used occasionally as a tub grinder for construction debris.
     
  9. beransfixitinc

    beransfixitinc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 592

    What I was thinking of, from looking around, would be to get something like these http://www.campingworld.com/browse/...577&siteID=nGt.Iox5rjI-yW60u5NoLGykwdYUjp1sTw and weld some square tubing up under the angle iron to weld these to.
     
  10. Mickhippy

    Mickhippy LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,205

    What about attaching some large bearings somehow? Maybe some large truck type bearings!

    get someone to make up a roller like the mower stripe rollers that go the width of the tail!

    edit... Just checked that link above and thats what I was talking about, the bearing looking roller!
     

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