? Drainage tile

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by lawnyogi, Jun 14, 2004.

  1. lawnyogi

    lawnyogi LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 73

    I have a client that wants me to put a drainage tile in on a part of his property. About 45' by 8". He feels it is easy, I have told him, I have seen it done only a couple of times, but he insists I can do it.:dizzy:

    If you think it is even possible, what is a going per foot cost to put a a 45' drainage tile system?

    Thanks
     
  2. Stephen M.

    Stephen M. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 192

    An old estimating guide says that you can hand dig the width and depth of a shovel, lay pipe, and cover 5 feet per hour. 45 lf divided by 5 f/hr equals 9 man hours. Times that by your hourly and presto, you have a job. Chances are you can dig faster than that, but then you can make possibly make good profit.
     
  3. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    OK.What are you draining?Where are you discharging?
    It is easy,but 45' does not need to be dug by hand.You need a backhoe or at the very least,a trencher.You need to drop your grade about 1 inch for every 10 feet,so at 45' you need to be about 4.5 to 5 inches lower than where you start.
    Give some more info and I'll try to help ya.
     
  4. lawnyogi

    lawnyogi LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 73

    Customer lives near a lake. He drains his pool water as it cycles in a spot between his and his neighbors place. Its a wet area all the time consequently. He planted two pine trees (about 12-14') a several years ago thinking this would help. Now he wants the drainage to flow towards the lake from the trees (which he would like removed also!) and there is already a slope... better than one inch to ten feet.

    I think I may use a trencher, but not sure other than that (even that) is open to your words of wisdom.

    The trees are at the begining of the 45'. I think I could cut then down and grind the stumps? Normally I would not mess with trees, but they rather small, with easy access.

    Thanks.
     
  5. lawnyogi

    lawnyogi LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 73

    .... And also... I am going to dig a large hole... is it called a french drain?... filled with stone as the end point. I think the length of the run should be enough. It is not THAT wet, and that is what the customer wants.
     
  6. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    The gravel filled pit at the end is called a dry well.A french drain is a trench lined with drainage gravel to allow the water to flow from one point to another.Most folks now use drainage tile in the trench as well as the gravel.
    Here's what I'd do.
    1.If you can discharge the water into the lake do it.
    2.If the area that is staying wet is very large,say 8 feet or more,run trenches across the area like tree branches(only straight).Then tie them into one trench running the 45' towards the lake.
    Like this
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    (discharge point)

    3.Hope you can understand that.
    4.Next line the trench's with gravel.Place a drain tile sock over the tile and install the tile.
    5.Next cover the tile with gravel and then place a soil barrier on top.
    6.Now cover with soil.
    Leave around 4 inches of topsoil over the trench so the grass will have a place to root.

    If any way possible,I'd rent a front end loader.You're going to have alot of dirt left over and you'll need a way to remove it and haul it,unless the homeowner wants it used somewhere.
    Remember,you're substituting soil with gravel and pipe,so you're going to have that much soil left over.
    Also,get a ride on trencher.You can see how much more digging you're going to need to do in order to correctly drain the water.Better yet would be a backhoe,especially if you decide to go the dry well way.I HIGHLY recommend discharging the water if possible or you're only going to move one problem to another area.
     
  7. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    that didn't turn out well.let me try it again using another method.
     
  8. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    Here's a quick 3D view of what I'm talking about.Hopefully you can get an idea from this.
    The two pines are the starting point and it discharges into the lake.

    drainageoverhead.jpg
     
  9. lawnyogi

    lawnyogi LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 73

    NickN

    Thanks for the help. The entire idea (except the feeding into a single pipe from six) was what I had in mind. But, I had not thought of the excess soil!

    Thanks for the very clear and enlightening advice.
     
  10. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    If you know where the pipe from his pool is,you can directly hook the drainage pipe to it and drain it towards the lake.You wouldn't need the extra pipes to drain the soil.
    Then it's the same thing.dig trench,lay gravel,insert pipe with pipe sock(holes downward),cover with gravel and topsoil.
     

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