Draining Febco 825 & 850 Procedures

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by mojob, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. mojob

    mojob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    I ran into a couple of these and was wondering how to properly drain them. According to Febco you have to loosen the covers on the diaphragms and inlet check valves. Is this really needed or are they being overly cautious? Also, if there isn't a blowout fitting on the downstream side of the outlet ballvalve, which test port can you blow through?
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,490

    825's need a complete dismantling and reassembly.
     
  3. mojob

    mojob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    You're pulling my leg, right?
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,490

    Hard to actually stop short of it. You remove the 825Y check valve covers. You remove the relief valve cover, and make sure the relief valve diaphragm pulls away from the body enough to drain all the water out. Also, this is your opportunity to see how the poppets travel in the guides on the covers. If they seem 'sticky' you clean out the guides, and maybe scrape or sand the poppet stems.

    If you aren't charging extra for this work, more power to you. Only the most recent designs have no dissassembly requirement. (like a Watts 009) - the older ones could have had extra testcocks for draining out every last bit of water, but they aren't there, for the most part.

    This extra work is why I'll always prefer a PVB to an RPZ, even if they cost the same (and they don't)
     
  5. mojob

    mojob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 515

    Wetboots, thanks for the reply. I guess I need to go back and tell the customer I need to do more work on it. We had a hard freeze before I blew it out so hopefully it didn't break. I also ran into an 850/860 so I guess I'll be going back there to loosen the covers on it. As far as blowing them out, is it better to use the inlet test port or outlet test port?
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,490

    Depending on your air source, you might not be able to blow through a RPZ without the relief valve springing open. That leaves you the outlet testcock only, for winterizing.

    Any RPZ with a cover on the side or on the low side in the center, needs that cover loosened or removed to drain part of the relief section. I think the Conbraco line was the only one that might have enough testcocks to eliminate disassembly requirements.
     
  7. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    I always open 'em up enough to make sure they dump, possibly push some air through with it open to make sure its dry. If you open #4 with air pressure, I find you get the water out of the lower check on the 825s. Then pop the cover. I like to blow through the device but keep the air under 60 psi. Then all I find necessary is to open the cover and let the last water caught in the relief drip. I don't re-assemble at this point. Put it back together in the spring when you can charge the extra to make it pass. Charging extra now puts us out of the market. Making it pass in the spring cuts the LCO guys out who don't do backflow work. Its hard enough to get $75 when a lot of them are charging $50. But most of our customers know that the guy charging less isn't available in the spring :)
     
  8. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    We install Febco 850 DCVA's. Since they are below the frost line, we don't take them apart. I'm wondering if there is still water stuck in the checks valves like a RPZ or does it just stick in the relief valve? I usually open both shutoffs at 45 degree angles and close the main valve.
     
  9. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    I think the title should have been .......860's not 850's. We're talking RPs I *think*. Doesn't matter if your connected before or after the DC, if you blow air through #4, you should suck the water out of the #2 check. I open and drain the BF before connecting air, then blow the system and make sure #4 is clean before shutting the air off. But, then I'm the guy who will cycle zone 4 on and off until that last spray head is dry too. I can still do as many or more per day than anyone I've ever worked with. I just think its worth the extra 30 seconds or two minutes to make sure I've done everything I can to completely void the system.
     
  10. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    While we are blowing out an 825y, we will lossen the four bolts and drain out the front. We don't take it all the way off or take out the relief valve. We just get it loose to allow the water out. Then we take out the #2 check valve as this is where it holds water and cracks. Then put back together.
     

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