Drawing off a lake

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by cjohn2000, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. cjohn2000

    cjohn2000 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    I wish I had more details at this point, I have seen a aerial picture of this site but haven't been there in person. The property is big enough my boss is talking about using Toro golf heads and putting in an agriculture tank to hold enough water to complete one cycle of the entire system. He even mentioned digging in the tank deep enough that it could gravity fill and eliminate the need for a second smaller pump to fill the tank. I am used to working with city water and not pumps. My biggest concern is the quality of water coming off the lake, that is why he wanted to use larger heads that were more suited for dirty water. He mentioned using an escalator pump? to do the high flow work for the sprinklers. Any thoughts, ideas, experience so we cover all the bases? :dizzy: Thanks, Corey.
     
  2. RussellB

    RussellB LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,029

    I'm not an irrigation guy and not sure what type of lake you are talking about but I know that several lakes around me are treated with something (algaecide?) and can't be used for irrigation for a while after being treated. I would check to see if a permit is needed to draw off the lake.
     
  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,907

    Just what kind of tank is going to hold enough water for a cycle of irrigation using golf course heads? You need about 10,000 gallons per acre in tank capacity.
     
  4. cjohn2000

    cjohn2000 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    I'm not quite sure, we only briefly talked about this project. IMOP I wouldn't gravity feed the holding tank. But at the same time, eliminating the holding tank would eliminate complexity. This big of a property I would think is going to require a land based pumping station. He said using standard residential zones it would take 40 zones in his opinion
     
  5. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,767

    It can be done, easy, if some sharp cookies design it. Alas, most of the movers and shakers in that field have retired. Might be thinking of multiple cisterns and transfer pumps. Sorry I'm not up there to consult, that kind of site was my meat and potatoes! :clapping:
     
  6. cjohn2000

    cjohn2000 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    Im really excited for this project, I will hopefully only half to deal with the irrigation and lighting. I was briefly looking at some numbers as far as flow and pressure and to use golf course heads like the hunter valve in heads we need 100 psi and roughly 80 gpm which means 3" main, which probably means gasketed pipe. So now i am thinking I40's with opposing nozzles. But I know there are issues that arise with reclaimed water where water treatment to prevent lawn diseases can arise.
     
  7. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,767

    It does sound exciting. However, up north we have a million varieties of phytophthora that love to breed in ponds and are spread by well-meaning irrigation contractors who are not versed in plant pathology. I'd have that pond tested; root rot is a way to make you look like a horse's ass. The world's foremost plant pathologist is in your area. Give me a PM, and I'll turn him on to you guys.
     
  8. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,075

    Think more and bigger my friend
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. txirrigation

    txirrigation LawnSite Senior Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 977

    10,000 gal @ 80 gpm will give you roughly 2hrs of run time before your out. That is assuming the tank was full when the cycle started.

    I say "assuming" because if you are using a mechanical float valve you will sometimes catch it in a low position where is is about to kick on the auto fill. A lot of people do not factor that in and run the tank dry. A foot or two difference in a 10,000 gal tank can mean a 2,000 gal holding difference.
     
  10. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,075

    43,560 cuft. per acre ft. 325,900 gal. per acre ft.
    27,154.29 gallons per acre inch.
    I don't see a 10,000 gal. tank without a pump and matching refill rate cutting it.

    Even applying .5 in per ft is over 13,000 gals. per acre.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     

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