dump insert or dump trailer?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by cutntrim, Mar 24, 2003.

  1. cutntrim

    cutntrim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 474

    Do you think I should go with a "Little Tipster" insert for one of my pickup trucks? Or should I trade one of my float trailers in for a dump trailer - maybe a 6'x12'?

    I'm currently 90/10 maintenance-vs-installation work, but I'm hoping to (gradually) bring it closer to 60/40. Aside from the obvious greater carrying capacity of a dump trailer, are there any other reasons to favor one over the other for landscaping purposes?

    The "Little Tipster" by Del Manufacturing runs $3000 while a dump trailer would be double that or more.
     
  2. ADLAWNCUTTERS

    ADLAWNCUTTERS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 191

    I WOULD BUY THE LITTLE TIPSTER. I V'E HAD MINE FOR A YEAR, I PAID AROUND 2,500 AMERICAN. FROM CASULLO"S AUTO HERE IN BUFFALO ,THAT WAS CASH AND CARRY. HIS PHONE NUMBER IS 716-876-3567 IN CASE YOU WANT TO SHOP AROUND FOR PRICE. DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY BUYING SUCH A SMALL DUMP TRAILER. IF YOU BUY THE TRAILER YOU WON'T WANT TO HOOK IT UP EVERY TIME YOU HAVE A JOB. YOU'LL END UP THROWING STUFF IN THE BACK OF THE PICK UP.GOOD LUCK
     
  3. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    Be aware that the dump insert adds weight to the empty weight of the truck reducing your payload capacity and increasing fuel consumption when empty. You will have neither a fully effective pickup or a fully effective dump.

    A dumping trailer is OK for hauling things off to the dump, but very limited in bringing product to a job site. It is hard to maneuver on the best of surfaces and particularly difficult when loaded on soft ground. Think about backing a heavy trail in moist conditions around the back of a property. A light pickup pushing a heavy trailer backward in a turn is not going very far.

    Have you considered trading in one of your trucks for a small dump truck? They are versatile, maneuverable, made to carry a load, and easy to drive. Cabover 1-tons with automatic transmissions are really fit the bill.
     
  4. ianc

    ianc LawnSite Member
    Posts: 49

    I live just North of Toronto, and seen a used dump trailer for $2700 CAN$
    it looked in pretty good shape!
    it's in the Port Perry area, if you want the phone # of the person selling it, send me an e-mail at ian@landscapeople.com
     
  5. mdb landscaping

    mdb landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,205

    i have a 6 by 10 dump trailer and love it. I use it for mulching, hauling rock and leaf cleanups. I can fit 5 yds of mulch in easy... and if i build sides i could get 8 yds. During the fall i put a leaf box on it and use it for leaf vaccing. ive heard many guys say once you put a dump insert in your truck, youve limited your payload capacity by a lot.
     
  6. ProMo

    ProMo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,468

    I was wathing a tv show a couple of weeks ago and they were installing a kit on a f150 that used an air bag to convert the bed to a dump it looked realy neat and was light weight and I think it had a 3000lb capacity. looked easy to install other than two pieces of the frame that have to be cut to install the hinges
     
  7. cutntrim

    cutntrim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 474

    I appreciate the replies thus far. I would agree with AGLA that a C&C little dump truck would be ideal, but I can't see parking one in my driveway (suburban home) and it's not ideal for my snow plowing work in the winter. If I go with a dump trailer, it would also have to double as a float for my maintenance equipment since both trucks are primarily maintenance vehicles at this stage. If going with a dump insert I would have to get heavier loads of materials (e.g. 3/4 stone) delivered to jobsite to avoid making multiple trips, and that expense would be passed on to the customer. Hopefully that wouldn't price me out of the picture when bidding against other (full-time) install companies. On the other hand, a dump trailer would allow me to eliminate delivery costs.

    One other consideration is that for now I am renting skid-steers as required. My current floats are not designed to carry anything heavier than a 400 series Bobcat, otherwise I'd have to pay (and pass on the charge) for delivery and p/u from the rental yard. This is usually $50 each way. But then again, even with a dump trailer that can handle the weight of a heavier skid-steer, I'd still have to make a seperate trip for the aggregate.

    This is giving me a headache!
     
  8. hosejockey2002

    hosejockey2002 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,195

    On the other hand, a dump trailer would allow me to eliminate delivery costs.

    You might save a few bucks on small loads, but if you're getting more than five yards of rock I would have it delivered. When I use to drive tandems for a small construction company, the delivered cost of material was not much higher than pickup cost. Same with topsoil. We could pick it up for $10/yard or have it delivered for $12. We didn't really save any money hauling our own import material. We mostly used the truck for exporting material.
     
  9. Shuter

    Shuter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    A dump trailer allows you to be more versatile. You will get more uses out of a dump trailer than a dump insert. If you get one big enough, you can also transport your equipment.
     
  10. longviewlawncare

    longviewlawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 298

    a 1 ton cab over with 4 whell drive would work awsome for snow plowing. I have known guys that run them and love them.
     

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