Earth Anchor retaining wall

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by steve5966, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. steve5966

    steve5966 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    I asked about Manta-Ray earth anchors a while back and didn't find anybody who had used them. The project has started so I thought I would post some pis and comments during the project.

    We needed holes in the tie wall before installing anchors. hattiesburg 021.jpg

    Needed a little dirt too. Six foot of fill on the left side just for a working platform.
    hattiesburg 023.jpg

    Time to put a little steel in the ground.

    hattiesburg 025.jpg

    After three days of test holes, failed tests and many phone calls we have visable progress.

    hattiesburg 020.jpg

    And two more days.

    hattiesburg 030.jpg

    hattiesburg 021.jpg

    hattiesburg 023.jpg

    hattiesburg 025.jpg

    hattiesburg 020.jpg

    hattiesburg 030.jpg
     
  2. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    out of curiousity, what does the wall face? does it look onto more houses, or a road?
    just wondering what the visual impact is.

    Also, did the property owner not want to replace the whole wall?
    and how old was the wall to begin with?

    sorry for all the questions, I'm just interested as I've never used this product.
     
  3. neversatisfiedj

    neversatisfiedj LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,028

    That looks like a very unwise investment. The wall looks 15 years old anyhow. Tear it down and go with a stronger product that will last 60 years.
     
  4. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    Ditto, I wouldn't wanna be tied to that wall in any way shape or form. No pun intended.
     
  5. Picture Perfect Pavers

    Picture Perfect Pavers LawnSite Member
    Posts: 58

    Did an engineer suggest that? Who was responsible to space them out?
    Does the Town inspector know about that?
    Have you ever heard of OSHA (the guys in the bucket)? That is a major fine and you posted it on the internet.

    What did you charge?
    What are the ties embedded into on the other side of the wall?

    I am all for making a buck and trying something new. But I wouldnt have touched that job without someone signing off on it.
     
  6. steve5966

    steve5966 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    A little background on the tie wall. The wall is about seven years old, if you look closely and count the deadmen you'll what the problems stems from. Hurricane Katrina sped up the failure. I'll post another pick of the failing section later that will make you cringe.
    We can't take down the ties due to the proximity of the apartment building above it. 28' seperate them and the end in the first pic is over twelve feet. Trees and swampy land face the wall, but we will be building a SRW in front of this wall to keep it looking good.

    If your unsure what a manta ray anchor is google it to get a visual of what were driving in to the ground. The steel rod you see sticking out starts out as three twelve foot sections 45$ each connected to a 76$ manta ray anchor. We pound them in and then use a hydraulic load locker to pull them back and lock them in place. The steel plate (65$) with the # on it acts as a washer to support the wall while were working in front of it. The number painted on is the thousands of pounds that anchor will hold. There will be a steel pipe spanning between every two rods which will hold the geo-grid for the SRW.

    This project came from the mind of an engineer. There are no inspectors for this kind of project where were at. From looking around this town I have more block for one wall than there is in the rest of town. I put some of my costs in the post so you can get an idea of what it runs to do this. I believe we have about 24,000 in steel on the site right now.
     
  7. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    I did actually look it up, b/c I was interested. I have seen that type of anchor before.

    nice job. :)
     
  8. Picture Perfect Pavers

    Picture Perfect Pavers LawnSite Member
    Posts: 58

    You have now tied that buldging,sagging, delapidated wall into the unknown soil next to the buildings footings and or under the building.
    If you put 36 foot worth of manta ray in a 28 to 12 foot area where did it go. What a collapse that could be someday.

    I would get an engineer. you spent 24k so far spend 5k on an engineer.

    The hydraustatic pressure/surge is not going away. It also looks like the wall is sinking that cant be stopped by those manta rays it will only pull everything down now. the problem is probably the swampy ground it was built on.

    Good luck.
     
  9. steve5966

    steve5966 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    PPP, this whole project is designed by a team of engineers that do these walls frequently. I'm not saying that they have designed the perfect project as it is currently going downhill due to the unknown. The last two days I have installed and pulled out too many anchors to count. Their next course of action is to go deeper and steeper angle, which is no big deal except I have to get more drive steel from Nebraska.(1000 miles from where I'm at) Every extra foot I have to go means more dollars for the building owner and eventually they may want to go another way. Right now i'm sitting and watching the rain fall while waiting for the 9 to 5, five day work week engineers to decide what to do.
    The wall isn't sinking, it just looks that way from the bow in it.

    This project is turning into a pita, but if you never try anything new, where will you be in the future? I am completely bored with the run of the mill hardscapes and landscapes and I love to do things out of the ordinary.
     
  10. Picture Perfect Pavers

    Picture Perfect Pavers LawnSite Member
    Posts: 58

    I am all for new things but dont let them be your downfall. Why not build a wall before it closer to the buildings. Step it excavate half its height and build a new wall abve it and use the manta rays along the bottom. Use the excavated soil in front of the deteriorated wall to support it.
     

Share This Page