Echo short block price?

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Shady Brook, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Does anyone know what it would cost for a short block on an Echo 260 trimmer? I have two with cylinder wear and an edger that is likely in the same situation. Is it worth rebuilding these units? I know Echo makes short blocks, but don't want to pay alot for them especially if it may not last long.

    Thanks
     
  2. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,327

    A wild guess would be $60. I never seen a need to replace a cyclinder unless it seized and even that can be fixed. Have you tried to put in new rings and give it a go.
     
  3. lawnmaniac883

    lawnmaniac883 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,613

    Go to your dealer and see what price he quotes from echo for a cylinder / piston / rings. Rebuilding one is very simple and straightforward. I would recommend you rebuild them if you have time to do so and if the parts arent too much money. My guess is that parts will be in the 100 - 120 range.
     
  4. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    I just got a price from the dealer and it was $163! Wow! Who would ever do a short block on a couple year old machine? That is insane. I have two units with scoreing on the cylinder's and a third that is likely shareing the same fate. I really want one unit that works to run a bush trimmer head off of, but they are all crapping out. I also have lost a Bush trimmer this year, it is just worn out. I can get two years on an Echo piece and they are just about done at that point. My Shindaiwa's keep ticking. The only Echo products that have lasted much past two years are the 650 blowers which seem to be chugging along fine.

    I don't know if crank seals would be enough to get the machines going again. I know compression is near #100 pounds. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  5. tallimeca

    tallimeca LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,229

    my quess is that if you have cylinder wear, you problably have wear in the lower end too. If you are going to do a shortblock, it's half the cost of a new trimmer.

    Cylinder and rings may solve your problem, but you are looking at still about 100 bucks, might as well go short block.

    Cylinder wear is caused by improper seating of rings. Usually related to, but not limited to dirt ingestion or carbon build up. Crappy oil and not running 89 octane fuel will cause it too. Many causes are related.

    I recommend using Echo oil, or ISO / Jasco equiv oil, 89 octane.

    A big mistake guys make on all brand trimmers and not checking to make sure their air filter cases are tight.

    Good luck!!!
     
  6. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Great post tallimeca

    I usually run 89 with a fuel stabilizer that boosts economy. On occasion I have been running 87 with the stabilizer. I don't know if the stabilizer is enough, but it acts as an upper cylinder lubricant. I use, and have used only Echo oil in all of these units since their purchase. I believe the air filters are often dirty as they leak gas something fierce shortly after being put into service. The air filters likely do not get the maintenance they need because they seem to get filthy so quickly. I could replace a filter a couple times of day to have what appears to be a semi clean filter. We run extra long string on the units as well, which I imagine is overheating them and causing damage. As badly as they are tortured I should not be suprised they are pretty used up after a couple years. I was thinking about trying a 261t for the added torque but they do not take my bush trimmer head as they have a different shaft. I am also concerned because of all the talk on a thread here that people are burning their arm on the power head. I could be wrong, but it sounds like they are overheating. I wonder if because they turn at a lower rpm that they are not able to cool themselves properly.

    I am ready to give Kawasaki my money for a while.
     
  7. Jim@MilkyWay

    Jim@MilkyWay LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    What do you mean by "extra long" and why do you run it. Torque is everything when it comes to speed. Too long a string slows down the string tip, which is where most of your cutting action is, because it falls off "the power curve".
     
  8. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    We take off the guards and run it from 10-14". I am on the low side, my workers like it longer. I am sure there is a loss of torque when going with a longer string as it is exeeding the engines ability to turn the string fast enough to cut optimally but I believe there is a point behind what the guard will allow that you have sufficient speed to cut effectively. I can trim a whole lot faster with more string then the guard will allow. Productivity speed is my main concern.
     
  9. Jim@MilkyWay

    Jim@MilkyWay LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    I certainly would agree with your assessment as far as the mfr. deciding for you, what is best. Some mfr. will even tell you to change the oil filter _only_ after every 15th oil change, ( I exaggerate a little ). It would probably be worthwhile to modify the guard and move the cutter back an inch and a half or so, such that you _can_ in fact optimize torque and speed, without having to trust your less experienced helpers to make "the right choice".
     
  10. newz7151

    newz7151 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Tejas
    Posts: 2,419

    Then why worry about shortblocking a trimmer engine? If productivity speed is your main concern, just buy new units, remove the guards, run the string at almost twice it's designed length, burn em up and buy a new one again.
     

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