echo srm-260

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by charlies, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. charlies

    charlies LawnSite Senior Member
    from earth
    Posts: 587

    i bought 2 last season. one had to have the carb replaced, the other, the engine locked up on it. echo replaced the carb on the one. wouldn't replace the enging on the other. said it was a maintenance issue with our company. it ran for about 3 months and we have a daily, weekly, and bi-annual maintenance program for all our equipment, including the trimmers. my partner, who runs the field operations, told me (i run the administrative end, and supervise the operation of 1 crew) they need a trimmer. i said great, redmax or shin? he said 'echo, the company has fixed the problem with the carbs'. i said are you sure you want an echo? he insisted. i got one, srm-260, just like the 2 last year. this morning, i was at the shop, as the crews were doing their morning equipment checklists, one of the guys brought me the new trimmer. 'it's not running right'. the exact same thing as the two last year'. start it up, runs like crap. after it starts running smoothly, 1-2 mins., it has very low rpms. that is 3 in a row. last echo for us. ever.

    by the way, we have been using echo for about 13 years and never had a problem until last season.
     
  2. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    Man, thats rough......

    I can appreciate your sentiments, though am sorry for Echo.

    I have some Echo equipment that has been absolutely bullet proof. Though not anything real new.

    My son bought a saw recently, nice, performs quite well. Some of the older saws he has inherited from me are still trucking.

    And that brings me to my point.

    For the handheld equip., and for "companies" I would aim to get two years or seasons out of the fleet. From there, you purchase all new, sending the old out yard sale style to some start-ups. Maybe blowers and edgers this year and Line trimmers in the other years. Good write offs and always have new stuff.

    I really liked the Shindaiwa T-230. Had four working and never had a problem. Went years without replacing them, due to the nature of our workload and maintenance program. Knowing I had been pushing too long, (and buying other types of things with our small equip budget instead) I bought four new all at once right at the end of the tax year. I saw no reason to part with the ones I had, and kept them in the fleet and left the new ones in boxes. Long about February, Got the inside info that Shin was going to be producing a new machine (CARB regs) and badge it the T-230.

    That wasn't going to be good for anyone.....

    My OPE dealer located four at neighboring shops, and I bought them from him. He wouldn't call his distributor and I didn't push him. I called his distributor, rather, I had the opportunity to deliver some goods to the distributor that my company produces, and I swapped my debris bags for six more. (What a deal, wholesale for wholesale, except I'm the manufacturer, and they had to pay Shind. I made out.)

    I was covered. And that would be the moral of the story. Like equipment in quantity of what works. Always purchasing the latest and greatest will get you a great variety. Lots of spares, none interchangeable.

    Find something that works? Buy a stack of it. Especially with the handheld stuff and CARB req. , I wish I had bought all of the Stihl BR-400 before that model was re-worked.
     
  3. lars

    lars LawnSite Member
    Posts: 117

    This brings up a good subject. How does CARB regulations effect those not in California? Is everything going to be up to CARB standards? Will the EPA adopt CARB standards? I'm an advocate to reduce greenhouse gasses, but honestly I can't see a huge impact made by little 2 stroke motors. Like many government activites, some of this is getting out of hand.
     
  4. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    Cal sets a standard, so to speak, and the rest of the country rides along. Being the state with the worst air pollution problems and the most dilligent efforts to combat them, everyone else follows along. (cheaper for the government that way)
     
  5. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    Completely agree with GeeVee. If you get 1 year out of a trimmer, just chalk it up as goods sold, so to speak, and buy a new one. There's no reason that your profit margin is so close that you lose money over $275 or so. Each add'l year is a bonus.
     

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