Ecoboost or 5.3 Vortec?

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by joed, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. unkownfl

    unkownfl LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,838

    No 4v 4.6 engines in a f150. Ecoboost isn't made to compete against a hemi that's what the 6.2 is for. The 6.2 comes in the xl model line too.

    Coming soon IRS for a Dodge...
     
  2. 360ci

    360ci LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 992

    3V, close enough.

    Canada spec here: the 6.2L is only available in higher model ranges or the SVT off-road variant.

    Edit:

    You Yanks get all the decent options in the lower trim levels as well as better workhorse engines. Must be nice.
     
  3. unkownfl

    unkownfl LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,838

    The 6.2 isn't on the website for the base model f150 but they're out there on the lots. There isn't even an eco boost on the lot yet here and we have like 10 dealerships within 10 miles when I look two weeks ago.

    I have the 3v wish I would have waited one more year to get the v6 non eco boost. I only tow a 3500lbs trailer about 20% of the time the rest is empty driving. city with the trailer I get like 12-13mpg highway around 16-17 depending how fast I go over the speed limit :hammerhead: all with the a/c on full blast here. I raced my friends wifes 1500 dodge with the 4.7 and beat him by three tenths with the same 60ft pretty much. His Hemi Wore my ass out though. I like the 3v its gets like 21mpg on the highway empty and has 300hp which is plenty for a 1/2 ton IMHO.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2011
  4. unkownfl

    unkownfl LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,838

    Lets not add inflation now. It's $27,065 in an xl or $24,650 in a XLT with the rebates which is the better option.

    http://bp2.ford.com/2011-Ford-F-150#page=/Models/
     
  5. DavidNJ

    DavidNJ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 514

    The Ford 3.5 L EcoBoost significantly bests all of its competitors below 4000 RPM including Ford's own 6.2 L. About 3000 or 4000 feet altitude, it would even have higher power above 4000 RPM. It is a new generation of technology with direct injection and double overhead camshafts that provide variable intake and exhaust valve timing. The turbochargers provide additional control over the intake air volume while the smaller displacement V-6 configuration reduces internal friction. The only significant feature missing is variable valve lift featured on some BMW and Nissan models.

    The question is: how often are you what flat to the floor above 4000 RPM? It is frequently with a trailer out back maybe a 1500 isn't the right size truck for you. Otherwise, the 3.5 L EcoBoost would be the best engine in this class by a comfortable margin.

    However engine isn't everything. The recent test, Edmonds rated at 3500 GMC narrowly above Ford F350. Although the Ford had more power and a nicer cab, the GMC had a new chassis under old sheet metal for 2011 which gave it lighter weight and better steering. The Ford was also tall enough to make parking a bit of a problem. In a similar manner, the Dodge's coil spring rear suspension could be considered a bigger advantage.
     
  6. Adirondack L&L

    Adirondack L&L LawnSite Member
    Posts: 17

    For anyone that hasn't driven a DI/Turbo engine, they're nothing short of amazing. If the name of the game is real world, usable torque it will own all but the largest V8s and diesels. Reliability and longevity is another story, that will take time to sort out.
     
  7. doubleedge

    doubleedge LawnSite Senior Member
    from ND
    Posts: 912

    Technically, new diesels are DI and turbocharged too :).
     
  8. 360ci

    360ci LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 992

    David, I agree. If I wanted a truck for sheer size to drive around in without using it for anything else, I'd spend the bucks and get the most fuel efficient engine, not necessarily for the fuel economy itself, but the range you can get. However, I checked online, and the 35EB only comes with the 98L tank (26 US gals), wtf???

    Again, I buy trucks for what they can do for me, and in this case the EB isn't the right engine to have in the F150 when you tow every day. V8's do similar work, at lower engine speeds which increases durability. I can see the EB transmission consistently hunting for gears when towing, and as it's a smaller displacement it'll be regularly in or above the 3000rpm range. The higher the boost, the more fuel you use....

    If Ford wants to win the performance game, they should blow the 6.2L. If anything, it'll make the 'Harley' guys happy when they tote around their show bikes. ha
     
  9. doubleedge

    doubleedge LawnSite Senior Member
    from ND
    Posts: 912

    The idea that the Ford Ecoboost will have to rev higher because it has lower displacement is baseless; just look at the numbers, it has more torque in the low rpm range than v8 engines. I don't see why you keep arguing against the numbers, saying that displacement is better than anything.

    And yes, it will have v8 like fuel consumption when it is being boosted, but when it is at a steady speed with low boost, it will have far less pumping and friction losses, which will increase fuel economy.
     
  10. DavidNJ

    DavidNJ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 514

    The EB is a LOWER engine speed than the current V8s. In 2011 the way it was is history. In order to meet emissions and fuel economy regulations while still meeting safety regulations and consumer feature desires which add weight, the manufacturers have all gone fairly exotic to achieve performance with longetivity and reliablity.

    Note, F1, where qualifying is usually everything, limits the teams to 8 engines per season, and they can't change engine or gearbox after qualifying. One lap of fuel can add 1 or 2 tenths of second to lap times. Reliability, fuel efficency, and performance are not separate; reliability and fuel efficiency are parts of performance.

    The new engines use better metals, tighter quality control, and different coatings to achieve levels of performance, efficency, and reliablity unheard of just a few years ago. Knock sensors let them run at peak performance without ever damaging the engine from exceeding it. The diesels in 3/4 and 1-ton models are pushing 800 ft-lb peak torque.

    The EcoBoost is far and away the best performing 1/2-ton truck engine, ESPECIALLY for towing. The Dodge probably has the better the chassis. The GMC/Chevy 1/2 ton is less than compelling.

    Note: the diesel are most definitely direct injection turbos. Not only that, their VERY expensive injection systems run at 25,000psi, 10x higher than the gasoline DI.

    Note 2: a CDI turbo diesel of maybe 4L or slightly smaller would be a great 1/2 ton engine. Now is someone made one...
     

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