electric spreaders

Discussion in '<a href=http://www.plowsite.com target=_blank ?>Sn' started by plowking35, Jan 23, 2000.

  1. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Ok some have been wondering how an electric v box spreader works. So being that I think I am the only one running one I will share my experience.<br>1- The amp draw and volt draw is much less then that of the plow, about = to turning your lights on. Plows draw like 15-20 amps I believe(new fishers are less)so my guess would be 10 at start up and like 5 once it is running.<br>2- It is quiet<br>3- No gas, choke, throttle or oil consumption issues<br>4- they install an urethane 6 vien spinner on it, and it has a great spread pattern, BTW, I am going to replace my 3 vien metal spinner on my gas airflow for better spread pattern<br>5- Down side is that to get the power to turn everything, the apron chain is very slow, so I have to 2x sand alot of places, or go about 5 mi an hour<br>6-Because it is so slow, I use alot less sand <br>7- When plowing I have a work light that comes on when the spreader is turned on, two reverse lights, and the plow and plow lights. I have 2 batteries and an 110 amp alternator, and never have had a problem with losing electrical power, but I am taxxing the system I am sure. During the day I can un plug the extra b/u lights, to help with electrcal draw.<br>8- It is all stainless(except the apron chain) so no need to worry about rust<br>9- Have to keep material in hopper from freezing, unit doesnt have the power to break the chain lose if it gets jammed.<br>10- I dont have to worry about breaking a chain because of to much power(hyro spreaders can do that very easily)<br>11- aside from a dual hydro set up, I will never own another type of spreader if I buy new. <br>12- They run about 5-700$ more than a mild steel /gas spreader. And about 500 less than a stainless/gas unit.<br>No maintenance on a gas engine to perform, just keep the connections clean and you are all set. Thurs morn we spent an hour doing work on the gas powered spreader and like 50 min adjusting the apron chain on my electric model.<br>Dino <p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  2. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Dino i wouldn't worry about your truck. From what my brother said with 110 amps and two batteries you good to go. <p>Geoff
     
  3. tru cut

    tru cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    dino, how do you wire yours. i have an airflo tailgate and just hooked it into my 7pin.works good ex. for 25below blew 2 30amp fuses put in a 50amp no problems yet
     
  4. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Tru Cut,<p>I don't want to tell you how to do anything. Only i wouldn't be altering my trailer wiring. I would have the sander on its own circut, with it's own fues or maybe a circut breaker. With todays trucks haveing complex wiring systems it is good to isolate any accessories from the truck wiring. <p>Geoff
     
  5. tru cut

    tru cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    geoff, the way i see it you are not telling anyone how to do any thing just sharing your vast knowlege with those of us who are new or not as experenced !!this forum has been a great help to myself and i sure meny others thanks for your reply .the trailer wire has 1 hot lead so i hooked into that i did not alter any thing else<p>----------<br>Todd <br>
     
  6. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Thats why you are blowing fues. You taped into that &quot;hot lead&quot;. With that 50 amp fues you won't blow a fues but will fry some wires. Your best bet is to run a wire from the battery to the back of the truck, you are going to need like a 10 g wire at least to accomidate the resistance encourted.<p>Geoff
     
  7. tru cut

    tru cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    thanks geoff, i dont want to fry any wires so as soon as it gets above 0 or even -10 i will rewire it<p>----------<br>Todd <br>
     
  8. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Tru cut what Geoff says is correct, that 14 or 16 gauge wire is to small for the amp load. <br>we have the same spreader on a ranger and we used 8 gauge to supply power to it. Also light duty switches wont handle that power either, so here is how we wire our electric spreaders.<br>On my v box <br>8 gauge from battery to hd relay<br>8 gauge from relay to 2 pole quick connect at rear of truck, from other side of quick connect we run 8 gauge to chassis ground<br>That handles the heavy wiring, then we ran 12v ignition source to a switch in the cab, and from the switch to the relay.<br>So when you hit the switch, 12v from the truck opens the relay and sends the heavy duty 12v to the spreader.<br>Now if you want variable speed control, boxxes are available from meyer/buyer/western or fisher. they have the relay built in and a circut breaker. it will run about 200$ but infinite control over pattern width is nice. they also over a simple on/off switch with overload protection for about 60$.<br>They wire pretty much the same as the relay example at the beginning, and will come with a diagram.<br>Dino<p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  9. DaveO

    DaveO LawnSite Member
    Posts: 238

    Dino,<p>I think you are a little low on your estimates of electric/hydro plow current drain. A couple of years ago one of my coworkers was complaining about his Toyota's voltage guage acting funny while lifting the blade on his 6.5 ft plow. Seems it would &quot;pin&quot; on the low side during the lift cycle.<p>Since this was a voltage guage, my guess was that the alternator output wasn't enough. I have the equipment to measure the current, it's called an amp clamp...you clamp over 1 feed, either ground or power. While lifting the blade the motor was drawing ~90A...when it topped out it over ranged the 200A scale. More than I ever expected....<p>He questioned about a heavier alternator, which I said would help, but not cure it. I recommended the HD alternator AND two HD batteries. The volt guage still moved, not nearly as much...dropped to 11 volts instead of 8. <p>Most trucks do NOT have an alternator capable of driving all the accesories and an electric/hydro plow...ALL THE TIME. But you are not moving the blade all the time, thats when the alternator can replenish the battery. What you need is 2 HD batteries to take the hit, and a HD alternator to &quot;catch&quot; back up while pushing/driving. Only pickup I know that has TWO alternator option is the new SD Fords. <p>As far as the spreaders, I would guess they draw 20-25 amps...... Like all electric motors...startup is at least twice that. Thats why you need a heavy guage wire.<br>Sorry for the lengthy post....<p><br>Dave<br>
     
  10. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    DaveO<br>Thanks for the input, by judging from my volt gauge I do see a serious voltage drop when using the plow, however very little from the spreader. I dont have the equipment you speak of, but all the more reason to install a heavy gauge wire to run an electric spreader, and to have competent installers of snow equip.<br>Dino<p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     

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