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Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) news and info

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by D Felix, Jan 21, 2004.

  1. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    If any of you read Arboristsite.com, you've probably already seen this. If not, take a look. This bug is a HUGE problem, one EVERYONE in the industry needs to be aware of!! Hopefully it will be contained, but right now, I'm afraid to guess where it will go.

    I'd post all of the info here, but it's a lot easier to give you a link.:D I think I've posted over two pages worth of posts over there, so take a look. It'll take a while to get through it all, but you **NEED** to know about this thing!! I CANNOT stress that enough!! If you value your bread and butter, this could turn your toast crispy black, quickly.(hehe, I just came up with that, like it?:D)

    Anyway, take a look, I would be surprised if the majority here knew of it. I'm not trying to start a firestorm of worry, the more you know, the better prepared you will be for it.

    The link: http://arboristsite.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=11825

  2. christhomasCLP

    christhomasCLP LawnSite Member
    from Mich
    Posts: 4

    A very nasty critter to say the least, I just moved out of wayne county, Michigan the area has been almost totaly striped of ash trees, they are just now getting results from field tests across michigan and have suggested a few products. you can see there suggetions on the Michigan State University Extention web site.
  3. brentsawyer

    brentsawyer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    If I remember all Ash are currently quaranteened in MI. I was up in Columbus last week and the bugs have made there way down that way and moving further south every year. No cure, just cut and remove infected trees.
  4. DFW Area Landscaper

    DFW Area Landscaper LawnSite Silver Member
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 2,116

    Couldn't they just treat all the ash trees in that 10km X 40km area with Merit?

    Just a thought.

    DFW Area Landscaper
  5. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Nope, not all ash trees are quarantined. Didn't read my info on Arboristsite, didja?:D IIRC, about 13 counties are quarantined, though that could expand later this spring when the bug becomes more active.

    They *could* treat the trees. Problem is, they don't know yet if that is effective. The only 100% effective way of control is to cut down the trees and chip to 1 inch or less. Pretty scary when you realize there are millions and millions of ash trees in Michigan alone.

    What they are doing is a much larger scale of what has been done (and is being done) in Chicago (and New York City, to some extent) to control the Asian Lonhorned Beetle. Chicago is a real success story. NYC, well, it could be if they'd get off of their a$$es and do something about it!

  6. Lanelle

    Lanelle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,361

    The problem is that some unscrupulous growers/nurseries are ignoring the quarentine and shipping Ash trees to other areas of the country. Over 100 such trees landed in Maryland last year via a grower in yet another state. Most were infected. As a result, the borer has been found in a suburb here in Northern Virginia. That area will soon be clear cut of all Ash trees for a sizable radius. Our state is taking prompt action to eradicate this pest before it becomes entrenched here. Too bad that didn't happen in other states. There is encouraging news from an area in CT as I recall. The eradication measures there are shrinking the population and number of infected areas. This pest is no joke. Serious measures must be quickly taken to contain and destroy this threat to our industry and the timber industry. The Bartlett Tree Research Labs can provide information as well as the state extension agencies.

    What to look for: "D" shaped exit holes in the bark of the tree. The adult is indeed a bright emerald green. It is rather small --only about 1/2" long and narrow bodied.
  7. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    READ MY LINK!!:)

    There's an article in there about the guy who shipped the trees from MI to Maryland. He deserves everything he gets.

    There's also 4-5 posts containing an Ohio State Extension bulletin on the EAB, very usefull info, very thorough info too.

    When Lanelle says they are small, they are SMALL!! 3-5 could easily fit on a PENNY. The only dead giveaway that it's EAB is the D-shaped exit holes.

    Something that I've been meaning to post on AS is that there are 160 other native Agrillus species that attack Ash too. However, the EAB is the only one that has the D-shaped exit hole, and it doesn't seem to care if the trees are healthy or not. Most others attack the trees that are already stressed....

  8. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    I just posted some more info. Follow the link above.

  9. brentsawyer

    brentsawyer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    The Columbus Cents show is having a 1 hour short course discussing EAB. I have not decided if I will be attending but would really be interested as to what will be said. I for one will be discouraging customers from buying any ash trees until more is known even though I sell almost as many ash as maple trees. Personally, I don't see this thing ever going away, the reproduction cycle of the EAB is too fast that just a few would be needed to sustain devistation and I would be real surprised if that could ever happen.
  10. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Just posted a news article that you folks on the east coast will be interested in!

    Again, follow the link at the top of the page....

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