End of season fertilizer,new yard

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by cross1933, Oct 25, 2007.

  1. cross1933

    cross1933 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165

    I reseeded my backyard on Labor Day Weekend, since this I have mowed the grass twice. About three weeks ago I reseeded and added starter fertilizer, waited one week and added a 18-0-4 fertilizer to combat rust in the yard. Do I put down a winter fertilizer on this yard?
     
  2. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Hmmm...I don't know what type of turf you sowed, but if you used predomenently bluegrass, and you fertilize with too much nitrogen (first number of the three) too late in the fall of the year, you stand the risk of opening yourself up for increased turf disease, especially 'brown patch', next spring and summer! I'd recommend, at this point, if anything, a 5-20-10 or something with a high middle # (phosphorus). But good luck finding that unless you go to a wholesale outlet for landscape folks.
    The best advice I can give you, at this time of year, is to sharpen your blades again real well, and lower them carefully a notch or two to a comfortable but reasonable height to mow at before we finish for the season. But be careful not to 'scalp' it! Doing this will help you have invaluable air circulation in the crown this winter. Mow the same level the 1st mowing in the spring, then slowly begin to raise the blades along with the rise of the thermometer as the spring progresses. :waving:
     
  3. cross1933

    cross1933 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165



    I purchased a new blade before the first mow on this yard. The previous blade was used to scalp the yard after applying roundup.

    I know that in the spring I will have to get some fert. to eliminate the broad leaf weeds in the grass.

    The grass seed is,
    19.83% Shamrock Kentucky Bluegrass
    19.80% Blue Sapphire Bluegrass
    19.66% lakeshore Kentucky Bluegrass
    19.63% Evening Shade Perennial Ryegrass
    19.36% Prosport Perennial Ryegrass

    Thanks for the tips!
     
  4. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    The grass seed is,
    19.83% Shamrock Kentucky Bluegrass
    19.80% Blue Sapphire Bluegrass
    19.66% lakeshore Kentucky Bluegrass
    19.63% Evening Shade Perennial Ryegrass
    19.36% Prosport Perennial Ryegrass

    Thanks for the tips![/QUOTE]

    You've got Lesco seed. I think 'Premium Athletic Mix'?

    Regular, yearly thorough soil aeration starting next fall will be very important for you. But, of course, it has to be done when the ground is moist enough to pull cores. And try to mow, or have your ' mowing people' mow, during the cooler parts of the day in the summer, if and when possible. This keeps some turf diseases better in check. :waving:
     
  5. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Wow that's a lot of nitro, first the starter then some 20% you likely got about 30% nitrogen waiting to react on your soil's ph...
    See without rain it hasn't had a chance, so I would be for dumping 3x 40 pound bags of lime per each bag of fertilizer you put down, it would help if you know the square footage because I would say 160 pounds of lime per 1/4 acre (or 4 x 40 lb. bags, per 1/4 acre).
    1/4 acre = ~11,000 sq.feet.

    That's to stabilize the ph, and it will help release some of the inactive ingredients in the fertilizer...
    With the stabilization and the added post-release effect it usually really helps, never seen it do no harm.
    Besides, lime is a slow acting agent, takes all of 6-12 months to work through, so now is a great time for that.
    Really I almost never put down fertilizer without lime, but you can follow through anytime, it's as good as putting down all that fert all over again, well, almost..!
    A lot cheaper, too :)
     
  6. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Topsites,
    I know we tripped over each other on two threads with similiar discussion, but, please, stop promoting lime to other people in different parts of the country where you know little if anything about the history of the soil!
    I imagine Virginia soil, where you are, may need more lime than you could give it. But over here in OH, IN, IL , etc. well, this is (generally) high pH country!
    And as far as your statement above: " never seen (lime) do no harm " (sic), well, you, of course know that's not true! Adding lime to a lawn that is, say already at 7.6 will raise it to something higher. That's harm!
     

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