Endless bottomless pit of goo!!

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Southern Heritage, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Southern Heritage

    Southern Heritage LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    I've been in the business a while. We have done dozens of major drain issues but this one I'm stumped. Worst part is its my back yard! I have a spring that bubbles out into a creek. No problem on that part but the rest of my yard stays nasty wet. So I got ticked and got my skidsteer and mini x and dug the creek deep as I could get and it's solid rock about 3 ft below water. Then I dug all the wet areas about 2-3' down. Put 6" perforated corrugated pipe and landscape fabric. Filled the area with gravel. 120 tons of number 4 gravel to be exact and top dressed with 40 tons base stone to drive on. I'm not worried about grass at this point, and the gravel has worked but it still floats or moves as I drive where it's sinking and mud from underneath is bleeding through. After this I decided to dig 6' deep. 12' wide 20' long I then filled it up with large chunks of concrete I had from a driveway demo, I walked them in as I set them. After 2 days I went back and it's large chunks of concrete with water everywhere. I then covered the concrete with dirt and started to work the dirt in. The concrete sunk probably 2 more ft as I drove on it. The Dirt turned to goo and I took the machine back to the shop and said screw it. Any thoughts? What has me irritated is what if it was a clients house. I'd have to walk away mid way through tail tucked contracting so,wine else to fix what I should be able to.
    If it helps the mud is a grey clay base that wiggles like jello. Never seen it before. It sticks to my bucket, clothes, boots, etc.
    Also on 3 different times I've stuck my skidsteer and or mini x where neither could get me out. Had to call a wrecker.
    Here is a pic of my mini x where it was on 100% dry ground but when I started to dig. Broke the crust and water came everywhere. I dropped my boom and shovel got off and watched it sink. It was eary feeling since my x only had 4 hrs
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    Here is a pic of the main area where I had trees taken down cuss they where dieing because of water. Huge pines 100' tall 3' diameter. I probably Lost 4 of 11 so I had them all cut. All the dark wet ground is where the drain and gravel is. Its still to nasty for a 2wd truck to make it.
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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  2. TruSomethingOrOther

    TruSomethingOrOther LawnSite Member
    Posts: 171

    Are you on a natural spring? If so, there's no doing anything. Wow. Is all I gotta say.


    Edit. Yes you're on a spring. Der. From the sounds of it, you're not gonna "fix" this issue.
     
  3. Southern Heritage

    Southern Heritage LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    Here is my next question I purchased this house and land from my family. My grandparents lives there since 1944. No water issues until about 10 years ago. What could have changed? When I was younger I kept my bass boat back there. I had 2wd truck also. It also had a huge water oak, Chinese chestnut and Cahaba tree. All died in the last 8 years. Now I had my Equitment back there also could it just be driving my 3/4 ton and 1/2 tone truck. I had trailers etc but nothing major like dump trucks skid steers etc. I don't know I'm just reaching at this point
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Water is always moving and the earth is always eroding... Tree roots build up soil and stability in wetlands and when they die the soil goes right into the water and the shoreline disappears... there is no difference from a open water lake and an underwater lake...
    You have a high water table,,, at least this year and there is nothing to be done about it other than fill it in adequately to hold the heavy machinery that you want it to... Just don't try to build a house or something like that... some situations are best left alone...
     
  5. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,872

    Plant some cypress and weeping willows and call it good. lol

    I would guess a(nother) spring has formed as Tru stated and you have very, very limited options.
     
  6. coolluv

    coolluv LawnSite Gold Member
    from Atlanta
    Posts: 3,563

    You have to dig it down past the goo. Maybe 10ft or maybe 15ft. At some point you will hit solid ground. Or semi solid ground. At 15ft you should be able to bridge over it with fabric and surge stone and good fill. 5ft of surge stone and the rest good dry fill.

    Need to compact without vibration [static] every foot. Vibration or over compacting especially in the beginning will bring the water to the top. Not what you want. You need to have the good dirt ready to go and fill it in fast..especially in the first few feet.

    Fill dirt needs to be dry. By the time you reach the top you should be good. You can hire an engineering company to test the soil for you and give you recommendations on how to fill it and how deep you need to go.

    We did jobs like this all the time when I was in construction. Around here all the good land is gone and the builders would build on anything. Mostly swamps and lowlands full of crap like that.

    One more thing. If water is coming in you have to stop that or isolate it. Cut a piece of 24 inch pipe and put a bunch of holes in it and stick a pump hose inside and fill with small rock. Pump the water off as you fill. Remove later and fill that small area in.
    Good luck.

    Dave...
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  7. Southern Heritage

    Southern Heritage LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    Dave you hit right on the head. The reason I need it fixed is where demoing my house and re building and the goo is where my future pool and pool house/ work shop will go. I did contact a engineer company and they said exact same thing. They will be out to test to see how deep it goes. Thanks again
     
  8. coolluv

    coolluv LawnSite Gold Member
    from Atlanta
    Posts: 3,563

    Good deal....let us know how it goes.


    Dave...
     

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