Enough W/Broken Wood Handles on Shovels

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by ed2hess, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    oke doke....or you can go to Lowes and buy a 16' piece of 1.25 inch conduit and cut it to length and put in with a bolt. Cost about $7. and I don't think it will ever ever break. Isn't that a better deal. I seen about 10 new shovels at our shop ready for the summer run. Next year we aren't going to need any new ones.
     
  2. Lbilawncare

    Lbilawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    The problem with bolting them in is the bolt will wear out and it also sticks out. Welding them whole pipe all the way around and then flap disc sanding it will eliminate those issues. Welding a cap on prevents water getting in and rusting the pipe also.
     
  3. Mikegyver

    Mikegyver LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,810

    I keep thinking I am going to do something like that with mine...I have stacks of broken tools, rakes, shovels, hoes, etc. Broke a hammer handle yesterday, that was a new one.
    Mike
     
  4. Tri-City Outdoors

    Tri-City Outdoors LawnSite Member
    Posts: 152

    Structron catalog

    http://media.midwestrake.com/combined-catalogs-seymour/#/1/

    Structron home page/parent company

    http://www.seymourmfg.com/

    We have been slowly converting all of our hand tools to all Structron. Great quality and the tool is designed to work for you.

    Kolbalt is lowes high end brand it is a good shovel and currently we own 3 for over a year. They are highly abused.

    A good hand tool will have a steel shank connecting the tool head to the handle. also a hollow fiberglass handle is junk.

    We keep a five gallon bucket full of sand and some old oil mixed in. just dunk the tool head in the sand a few times. Cleaned and oiled. no mess.

    Also we sharpen all tools when we buy them it makes a big difference. Beware it is also much easy to cut irrigation & utility lines.
     
  5. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    Yes that would be the correct way good suggestion. I keep avoiding gettig a welder cause just don't understand i could see thru those visors.



    Well they certainly have almost anything you need. Missed seeing springee rakes. I really like your idea of having a bucket of sand and oil to dip. My sons always keep asking why the shovels in my truck are so sharp. Funny how when you use them in this texas rock how they get sharp.
     
  6. Herb Flerb

    Herb Flerb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 22

    its normal too break a shovel ounce and a while, but if your guys are breaking them on a normal basis you should have a talk with them.
     
  7. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    Most of ours are failures of the wood or fiberglass. I don't think I have ever broke a handle. But darn if I know how to teach somebody how to just stop short of the break point. And it would have to translated. That is why I am putting metal handles in. I stopped and looked at an irrigation crew today and all handles were pipe.
     
  8. alexschultz1

    alexschultz1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,555

    I will never buy nice shovels. All mine cost $7.50 and when they break... Soooo what.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    Lets see....for a crew of 3 maybe they would have 12 wood handle devices at the start of the season. So that is probably $150 and lets say you go three rounds of breaking. That would be almost $500. And that don't count the fact when someting breaks and you don't have back up who knows what that cost might be. So to cover that we double or tripple the amount of stuff . It is an annoying cost that I intend to fix.
     
  10. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    This is an example of fiberglass with a core. This shovel was bought last year:dizzy:

    039.jpg
     

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