Equipment photos

Discussion in 'Original Pictures Forum' started by etwman, Dec 20, 2002.

  1. etwman

    etwman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Alright, did you seriously think we fell off the stupid cart?
     
  2. deere615

    deere615 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,676

    Ok wait sorry I didnt mean to offend you but in your previous post you said "We will not be soliciting anyone who is not a prior client of ours" and I read it wrong I thought I thought it said anyone who was a prior client, double negative confused me sorry.
     
  3. etwman

    etwman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    I'm just yanking your chain. Let me redefine it this way, this should be simple enough. If your name isn't in our database of clients, present or past, you won't be eligable to be on this program. Now if you want to be on the program, you'll have to do a build project with us. Better?
     
  4. deere615

    deere615 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,676

    Got it and I don't blame you for doing it that way either!
     
  5. brian1425

    brian1425 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 131

    ETW - I believe in previous posts you stated that you believed a company should not offer multiple divisions or services. What has caused the change? The conversations of mulitple divisions vs a business focused on one service has always been intriguing. I have always believed in one business without divisions.
     
  6. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    I'm bored, here you go:

    "We started hard in maintenace 10 years ago, strayed from it into design/build, then higher end design/build. Our weak link over the past 3-4 years became the lack of post follow up with our projects. Our clients would say, "you've build this phenominal backyard for us, honored warranties, but we just don't know how to maintain it." "Billy", the local landscaper, would be hired to remulch, hack the shrubs, etc. and the place would become a mess. After hearing a handful of our clients request something like this from us, we decided to relook at it. Design/build is our passion, I'm not going to negate that, but we have to take care of our existing clients. They know our repuation, and know that when we do launch this, it will be a program that will be right. You have to delicately give your clients what they want, while maintaining growth and profitability. Its a dancing game, and you have to make the right moves."
     
  7. etwman

    etwman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Brian does have a viable question so let me try and give my opinion on it. I think its one thing to start a new division that incorporates high tree pruning, deck building, irrigation, carpeting, milking cows, and taking kids to school. I have some of those kind of ideas on a side board that has always intriqued me but feel it would derail our focus. As you know we're not a huge company and spreading yourself too thin, not being able to pay for knowledgeable employees, and buying tons of equipment is dangerous. This is where I see other small companies out there that do 100 different things and I say to myself "no way."

    Then there is our new GROW division. Basically Brian its services we already have done in the past or are even currently doing on our new builds. Yes we've added some cool unique things to it, but they are simple things that the clients want. What we've done is put them all in a melting pot and presented it to our clients and have gotten rave feedback. We don't really have to buy tons of equipment, we already know the properties, and we have someone with a hort background to head it up. It's not what I would say is a "rocket science" division or something that will derail our focus. It'll be a good solid mesh with what we already do, making us a much more appealing company to our clients.
     
  8. etwman

    etwman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    At the conference Joe Calloway autograph my book and wrote a few sentences in it, which mind you is all marked up with ideas and notes. That was pretty cool. That is a book that I'll go back and read again probabaly once every year or two and gain more insight from it. You can never stop learning from something like that. Joe is an icon.


     
  9. Lefet

    Lefet LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,887

    Subscribing. Haven't read the whole thread, but I've seen "etwman" posted around and believe there is some good information here.
    Besides, a sense of humor is always good!

    Brian does have a viable question so let me try and give my opinion on it. I think its one thing to start a new division that incorporates high tree pruning, deck building, irrigation, carpeting, milking cows, and taking kids to school. I have some of those kind of ideas on a side board that has always intriqued me but feel it would derail our focus. As you know we're not a huge company and spreading yourself too thin, not being able to pay for knowledgeable employees, and buying tons of equipment is dangerous. This is where I see other small companies out there that do 100 different things and I say to myself "no way."
     
  10. brian1425

    brian1425 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 131

    Yes, it will mesh very well with what you are currently offering, plus protects your clients and yourself. I believe that it will work out great for you.

    Here is where I totally agree with you. "Only offered to previous or new clients." My problem with multiple divisions is any time spent on one side of the business could have been spent building the other side. You lose focus. Your new division is a product of your hardscape side, so you still focus all of your energy on becoming better & growing the hardscape.
     

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