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estimate/workorder

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by T.E., Mar 11, 2003.

  1. T.E.

    T.E. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 799

    I have never used estimates or workorders before, allways just verbal contracts. What I'm wondering is how do you guys handle this? Do you keep a copy for yourself or do you keep the estimate and give the customer the quote on a different form or what any help on this wou ld greatly appreciated I have allready learned a lot from this forum. Thanks T.E.
     
  2. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    They are 2 different things. As far as estimates I have 3 copies. One goes to the customer, one stays in the book, and one gets filed in the office. the reason for this is when the customer calls back I know what the heck I am talking about. Also my estimates are good for 1 year.

    A work order is what my guys give me if they need anything new. Uniforms, safety equipment, etc. have to get approved first. they fill out work orders, and upon approval they get what they need. These also get filed.

    Hope I answered your question. :cool:
     
  3. KLMlawn

    KLMlawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 443

    And which guys would that be Paul??? LOL:drinkup:
     
  4. Henry

    Henry LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 549

    Is your estimate sheet made up like a contract or do you just leave them a sheet with with prices and set up a contract when they decide to go with it?
     
  5. KLMlawn

    KLMlawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 443

    I personally feel that just a sheet with the relative pricing is best ... the reason being that it usually can be fit and presented well on a single sheet and they are seeing an outline of the full scope of your operation without getting too specific and wasting your time on something you may or may not get the job to do.
    If they show interest and/or decide for you to do the job, you can then schedule an appointment to stop by and go over everything ... company policies, payment, responsibilities, etc. and to answer any other questions they might have, along with making sure that all necessary signatures are in place ... in person. I find that this paves the way for a much smoother and hassle free "company/client relationship".
     

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