1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community in the Franchising forum .

    Dismiss Notice

estimating total cost

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Millerman, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Millerman

    Millerman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    I am trying to find a formula for estimating the cost for a irrigation install for my school district. I only need a rough figures to get the budget line started. Something like $ per square foot etc. Any help will be helpful. Thanks.
  2. Mark B

    Mark B LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    $165 per rotor
    $100 per spray
  3. NC_Irrigator

    NC_Irrigator LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NC
    Posts: 1,415

    ^ his figures are about right in line for NC. Just A few dollars higher than i quote, but not out of line.
  4. Broker

    Broker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    Good Luck with those numbers.
  5. Sunset

    Sunset LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    If you have a Ewing branch nearby try them. They’ve helped me with design work and material take off. I won’t use the residential $120 per zone price on a commercial that might have a 1 1/2” main. www.ewing1.com
  6. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    $120.00/zone? I sure hope that is a misprint. Tell me that ain't so. We don't use a per zone figure for pricing, but for rough ballpark estimating we are somewhere around $500-$600 for a residential zone.

    You might have Jay Riviere with Ewing Houston check over that bidding scheme with you. I think you could make some changes and make some money.

    Jerry R.
    Tx Lic Irr #1452
  7. Broker

    Broker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    I thought someone said $100 per spray and $165 per rotor. Atleast around here you could get those number if it was still 1990.
  8. greenworldh20

    greenworldh20 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 659

    Materials + Labor + Overhead + Profit = Price

    then check your price against what the market will bear.

    is their a way to increase your productivity or be more efficient?
  9. Sunset

    Sunset LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    My average direct material cost is 120 per zone. Labor is cheap, trench diggers are 50-60 per day. I bid against guys charging 250-275 per zone all day long. It’s hard to get more then 325-350 per zone in my area.
  10. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    Okay, material cost of $120 is a little easier to take. (Otherwise I was going to offer you $200 per zone and invite you over to Corpus as a sub-contractor!) <chuckle>

    I understand about the low prices. They have that here too. Some are still installing systems for the same basic price that we used 25 yrs ago. That is one of the main reasons I don't chase after installs. Would rather follow those clowns around and fix their mess. Only installs we do are from references, and I explain that if they get prices from nearly everyone else in town, that I am going to be in the higher end if not the highest. Much easier that way. Weeds out the tire kickers and price shoppers real quick.

    We even have one clown, who is licensed by the way, tell the customers that he will beat the competition by $400.00!! Of course the systems are not even close in comparison, but they are a "legal system" by definition. I usually don't work on any of their systems unless it is a broken line or head. No renovation work following their install - it would need to be a new system.

    Jerry R
    TLI #1452

Share This Page