European mountain ash with fire blight?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by hblanddesign27, Aug 22, 2009.

  1. hblanddesign27

    hblanddesign27 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Hi guys,
    I tried posting this in the new treeservices site, but I was told that I couldn't post because : no reason specified, and that the ban would be lift: Never. So, I thought this would be the next best shot. A client has a mountain ash that is has been withering all summer. Leaves are dying, turning yellow, then brown, and the orange berries are shriveling and dying. But only portions of the tree. It has been pretty dry here outside of chicago, so it could be suffering from a lack of water. I have enclosed a picture of a close up of a leaf and berry that is dying. I know this isn't a good picture. Unfortunalty a had already removed most of the damaged limbs. Any ideas is this is actually fire blight or something else? Thanks,
    Kevin

    IMG_3556.jpg
     
  2. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    27,
    When it comes to fireblight----too this extent of total defoliation, the tree doesn't have enough energy reserves to survive the disease.
    Fireblight attacks several varieties of trees here in Arkansas--specifically the Pear and Peach trees. Mostly the ornamental pear trees are hit the hardest. For this very reason, we have ceased micro injections-because of the late fate of control.
    The best time to control this disease is to apply fungicide at bud break since this disease vector lives at the bud tip or on the branch cracks. Similar in habits as Anthracnose, this disease has to be treated before it attacks in the Spring at early bud break and be continued on 2 week intervals.
    From what I see in the photo, there is not leaves at all!!! If there is any sign of leaf start try fertilizing the tree with a slow release fert preferrably deep root injection. If no signs of leaves at all, cut the thing down and replant another species that is fireblight resistant.
    My deepest gut feeling tells me that this tree is toast............!!

    Good Luck!
     
  3. hblanddesign27

    hblanddesign27 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Thanks green thinker, I am worried that untreated the tree will be a goner, but this picture is decieving. About 80% of the tree is covered with green leaves, I just took a close up of one of the dying areas to see if it could be recognized as fire blight? There are no open sores, and like I mentioned before, I am not sure if it is just thirsty cause of the current dry times, or is fire blight.
     
  4. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    27,
    Forgive me for not asking further about the tree. Typically, during early signs of this disease, cutting or removing the diseased stems,limbs,branches is the only way to sever the spread. Burn the remnants and definately disinfect the cutting utensils. Fire Blight is a air borne pathogen................!
    The tips of the trees and the branches are always noticed first, and during severe outbreaks, most of a tree is defoliated until more foliage is restored. The think is that most of the energy is being used to fight the disease than to put back on foliage,so slow release ferts are the only solution currently. Streptomycin Sulfate is the product for control and prespraying at bud break. This is a systemic and a surface controlling chemical. You can use Manab or Zinab at bud break too!! This years damage is uncontrollable, so trim off the dead---burn it or dispose of it properly--sterilize you tools.
     
  5. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    27,
    Sorry for double-posting, but this info. was from my memory of dealing with this disease in the spring or when the heat gets on.
    Here is link for extra support.

    learningstore.uwex.edu/Mountain-Ash-Disorder-Fire-Blight-P465C96.as...
     
  6. hblanddesign27

    hblanddesign27 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Great, thank you for the information. So in your opinion, that looks like fire blight, not dry weather?
     
  7. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    27,
    From the close photo of the current years growth and the fruiting bodies, that there are knarled branches. This disease only attacks so far onto the stems. Stem disfiguration is sometimes noticed. From first glance, it appears to be Anthracnose damage in the second and third stages or 2nd and 3rd year disfigurement.
    The only other option that is possible will be grey mold damage, but without a close view of the leaves and the fruit, it is highly unlikely. The black areas other than underexposure on the photo's leads me to say Fire-Blight............Final Answer!!
     
  8. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,162

    27 and Green: Fireblight in Apple trees is treated with an antibiotic every 10 days in the spring. I don't know about the European Ash. Our apple trees develop dead leaves and twigs on some of the ends like indicated. I'd like to know what happens to that tree just for my curiosity. The antibiotic works well for apple trees. The antibotic is used during the flowering of the tree. I checked my reference for the bearing fruit and it does bear. Spray it with a couple of gallons during the blooming every week-10 days. Roy
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2009
  9. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,779

    Last edited: Aug 22, 2009
  10. hblanddesign27

    hblanddesign27 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Thanks for all the help, I know it is hard to diagnose looking at one leaf and fruiting. I am going to prune off the dead and dying limbs and see what happens for now. What would you suggest using to disinfect the cutting tools?
     

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