Expert Help Please

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Hard Worker, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. Hard Worker

    Hard Worker LawnSite Member
    Posts: 186

    I'm considering planting some crape myrtles around my property. Is it too early to plant those? Rockwood Tenn. is in the eastern portion of the state. Expert opinions please.
     
  2. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    No, now is a great time to plant such a tree. Maybe a little late. Digging the correct hole is most important. :rolleyes:
     
  3. Hard Worker

    Hard Worker LawnSite Member
    Posts: 186

    Thanks, may I ask a dumb question? What do you mean by correct hole?
     
  4. Allure

    Allure LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 426

  5. Hard Worker

    Hard Worker LawnSite Member
    Posts: 186

    Thanks for the advice and navigation to that thread.
     
  6. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Once spring comes around begin watering them a little to help give them a head start.
     
  7. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    myrtles are pretty forgiving but a big mistake on most trees are planting too deep. The other is the hole should be at least twice as wide as the container/root ball. Don't back fill because the tree will settle, I would rather it be too high than too low. Don't pile up mulch on the trunk of the tree.

    Secondly, don't dig in wet muck.

    Water the plant before planting, dry root balls are bad. Water once about 1/2 back filled after the tree is set. Use as much native soil as possible, don't amend the soil.


    Don't do a smooth hole because roots will grow in a circle, a square is better than a round hole, but just roughing up the sides is often good.

    Check the root ball before you place it in the hole and break up ( not bust up completely) the roots so they don't grow in a circle and girdle themselves.

    PS many container trees come too deep, because as they get bigger and are moved to larger containers, the people add more soil on top.

    A tree should never look like a telephone pole sticking out of the ground. There should be some flare at the bottom, looks kind of like your foot with the curve out.
     
  8. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Depending on the soil you are planting........DO amend the soil.

    Here in northern VA........lots of the worst crap I've ever dealt with. Yeah its native but if you want your plants to grow green instead of yellow you MUST amend. If you are planting in true, good topsoil then sure you shouldn't need to.

    Also, is the plant coming from a container where its had nothing but potting soil? If so, amend the soil as a "transition".

    Also #2.......the roots are starting to grow, if they go straight into bad soil the plant will be slower establishing. The plant could also go into shock. Slower root growth means a need for more water as the plant does not yet have sufficient resources for water.

    Then you can run the chance of drowning the plant from watering it too much..........bad soil may not drain and the plant could be sitting in a pond. If this is the case dig your hole deep to enable to water to get away from the roots.
     
  9. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

  10. MarkintheGarden

    MarkintheGarden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,072

    Hard worker, I have found that I can plant any time the ground is not frozen.

    One consideration is that plants planted during the cold season have to be treated like a new planting till the spring comes and they can establish a good root system. Last winter we had a couple of dry months and new plantings required wattering in the middle of winter.
     

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