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Extra insurance policy

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by lawnkid, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. lawnkid

    lawnkid LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 935

    I know you guys are probably sick of hearing this but I couldn't really seem to find too many answers from some of you guys who have been doing paver work for such a long time (chris, mike, dan, both marc's, kris etc). When installing the 4 patios we've done so far this year for relatives (just kinda messing around) we used 8" of 411 crushed limestone as a base and screed 1" concrete sand and lay pavers on top. I have never been told this is a bad thing to do but is there a difference in 8" and 4-6" of aggregate base that most manufacturers and industry specs call for? Some guys don't put less than a foot around here and that seems a little much. I guess what I'm asking is if the extra 4" I'm tamping really an insurance policy on the patio or is it a bad practice and I should only follow industry specs for longetivity of patios. Thanks
     
  2. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    I always due 8-12in of compacted base. Anyways it always seems that on my jobs i am raising grade up to level the patio/walkway and end up having to put atleast a foot down.
    Hell, i have not done a hardscape install this year where i did not bring in atleast a tadem load of qp!

    Matt
     
  3. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    We use 10"-12" when installing drives, 6"-8" for walkways and patios. The amount of material required and/or geogrid is determined by the given soil conditions, and traffic bearing. Either way you slice it, I would rather have more than less. :)
     
  4. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    8" is over kill for pedestrian use

    ICPI specs 4-inces for pedestrian use.

    For the last 10 years we have been doing 5-inches. No problems here.

    One ingredient that no one mentioned, and it IS a CRITICAL ingredient is GEO-TEXTILE fabric.

    It's a MUST.
     
  5. GreenMonster

    GreenMonster LawnSite Silver Member
    from NH
    Posts: 2,702

    I believe the ICPI 4" spec is a minimum. We typically do a 6"-8" base for walkways and patios, as we have freeze/thaw concerns. We will go deeper if necessary depending on native soil (generally, we don't find a lot of clay in this area). We always use geo-textile.
     
  6. Team-Green L&L

    Team-Green L&L LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,776

    The extra couple inches won't hurt, but it extra work. No one likes extra work.
     
  7. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260


    I don't think you should be the one determining the proper way to install pavers.

    Matt
     
  8. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    Better watch yourself with that. You would be surprised the things that end up on patios and walkways. (ie: hot tubs, motorcycles, HUGE planters, sand boxes etc.) I also show concern with our freez/thaw cycles in the NE. Honestly soil conditions would have to be perfect for me to us 4" min on a walkway. I would never use that little on a patio. JMO
     
  9. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Seeing as how a lot of excavation is done with a skidsteer, getting more than 4" of stone for a walkway isn't hard to do if you overdig a little accidentally. :) Trust me, just did it last week!

    I certainly wouldn't go any less than 4", and more than that won't hurt a bit. DEFINATELY want geo-textile of some sort under the base!

    It may be extra work, but it's cheaper than coming back to do warranty work when you get settling!
     
  10. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Yea i am only have 80hrs on my 246b and i tend to over did alittle on every job. Who cares though. Its all worked into the bid.

    Matt
     

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