feeling like a new guy

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by rmland, Apr 21, 2004.

  1. rmland

    rmland LawnSite Member
    Posts: 57

    I just moved my biz from CA to NC. I must humbly admit that I know nothing about this thig called winterizing. You mean it gets cold enough to freeze pipes?? I am lucky enough to have time to learn. If any of you cold blooded folks have time I would love to hear about installation and maintenance considerations. Thanks
  2. i am in same situation as you...but luckily I still have the business in AZ.....the cold weather systems are strange to me.

    If you are in an area that requires blow-outs...that is a good thing. Great for business, a huge boost to revenues every fall....congrats on the move. I hear Asheville is a nice place in the Mts. of North Cacalacky....
  3. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,642

    Winterizing and spring turn ons , the guarenteed income of irrigation. start looking for a air compressor with a minimum of 50 cubic feet per minute at 90 psi. a hose reel capable of holding 150 feet of 3/4 inch hose , and you make up a whole kit of adaptor fittings for different systems.
  4. Mark B

    Mark B LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    I'm bout 3 hrs from you. I don't blow out the systems here in Burlington, but you are in the mnts, I'm in the foothills. I'm sure it gets alot colder there then it does here. I would start asking some supply houses about the winterizing.

    When I winterize here I just remove the backflow and turn the valves 1/2 way open. You will love NC wait till you see the OBX and I hope you don't the bug for catching the BIG reds at hatteras.

    I'm going in 2 days. Yeeepie :D
  5. TennTexan

    TennTexan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    Here in Memphis we don't have a frost line per se, but we do blow out some of our systems. I don't think it's ever a bad idea, it won't hurt anything.
    We hook up an air supply to some point in the main line after the in-ground shut off valve. For us, that is usually the #4 test **** on the rpa (backflow preventer). We use tow-behind air compressors with a 185 cfm capacity. Don't use a compressor that is too small or you won't have enough airflow to do the job. also, I have had problems with valves sticking open with a too-small compressor, then you can't finish the job. BUT make sure to set the regulator on the compressor down to 65-70 PSI or so...if you just rent a compressor from a rental place it's likely to be set at 100-110 PSI....you want to blow the system out, not blow it up!!!
    Once you get the air supply hooked up and turned on, just go through each zone from the controller and let it run until it is blowing mostly air out of the heads. One tip here is, if you know, or have an idea, which valve is at the end of the run/farthest from the water/air supply, blow that one out first. That will help evacuate the main line better and will make the other zones go a lot quicker. When you are done, leave the last zone running while you shut off the air supply so the air can bleed out. Unhook and you are done! Hope that helps
  6. Mark B

    Mark B LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    Here are some of the things we get to catch here in NC :D

    40lb #2.jpg

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